Under counter sink not flush in granite counter

Is there a standard for installing under mount sinks in a granite counter? The company who created the counter top cut the hole for the sink about 1/4 inch larger than the sink opening all the way around so that, when looking down from above, we see 1/4 inch of the stainless steel sink.
--| This is a side view |_ | |
The guy who measured for the counter top didn't mention any options or give any choices. Our neighbor has a granite counter and her sink is flush.
I will call the sink manufacturer to see what they say, but was curious if there was a good reason to install it this way.
Do we have a valid complaint here? This is NOT what we were expecting.
Thanks!
Joy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

was a flush opening with the sidewalls of the sink, and the other is a recessed one. It sounds like you have the recessed option. I would hope you were consulted as to which one you wanted, for it is too late now.

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The measuring guy took the template that came with the sink. I did call the sink manufacturer and was told that there would be no problem installing the sink flush if that is what we wanted so it's not a matter of incorrect installation vrs correct.
I still think the guy who measured should have given me the option of flush with the granite since I never even considered that there would be another way to do it (which is why I'm starting to get annoyed when people say I should have requested it... I never thought there was more than one way it would be done and NOT this way!).
I suppose a discount is the most I can hope for. This is why I'm looking to the people here to tell me if I'm being unreasonable.
Joy
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On May 27, 11:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

To make you feel better about it, if you have to revert to a top mount for your sink, it is probably somewhat more sanitary, since there are no overhanging ledges that are difficult to clean.
Joe
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

    Sorry to hear that you were not given the choice. I recently had a new countertop and under mounted sink installed. Since I purchased the sink and had it in hand when the countertop people measured for the counter I knew exactly which options I had. That being said, I opted for what you received because after having talked to several others who had such a sink, I thought the joint where the under mounted sink and countertop meet would be less apt to accumulate crud. I realize that they caulk this joint, but a flush mount does create a larger cavity than the recessed one you have. I don't know if this is any comfort to you, but I just thought I would share my experience with you. You might talk to some who have an under mounted sink and see which they prefer.
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Hi Ken, Thanks for sharing your experience with me. I think you are correct that the joint in a flush mount would be slightly larger but it IS sealed with good silicon caulk so I doubt any crud would get in there. But now I have the 1/4 inch top lip of the sink to clean and I don't like the look as much.
I'm still looking for opinions as to whether the granite place should have given me an option. They say my designer should have gone over that with me and I should have mentioned it to them. I had a guy do all the work (designer? HAH!) and he didn't think about it since I did most of the dealing with the granite place. He just got a price and told us to pick what we wanted in a certain grade. I'm still feeling the granite place has all the experience and should know the sink options since they do it all the time. They COULD have done it had I asked but I DIDN'T KNOW to ask as I keep telling them.
SHOULD they have asked and do I have a right to be unhappy they didn't and should they do SOMETHING for me pricewise?
Thanks, Joy
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Joy wrote:

Joy,
Sorry about your experience. They might have asked but unfortunately they are not obligated to ask. If you bought a car off of a dealers lot and then complained, " I didn't know it came in blue", you have the right to be unhappy. But the salesperson wasn't obligated to tell you it came in blue. Caveat emptor. You have the right to be unhappy, but I don't think that anyone is obligated to do anything about it.
I don't think that they have any obligation to knock anything off they existing price. If you asked nicely, they might replace the sink slab with one with the cutout you're looking for at a discount (addn'l cost admittedly). Your best recourse on the existing work is with your designer not the granite fabricator.
S
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wrote:

Thanks for the input, S. I can't disagree with you and nobody else has, either.
I find it sad that they didn't ask even if they didn't have to. They wouldn't have had to do much, if any, extra work and now they have a less than 100% happy customer. (I didn't bother to mention the hole and the dimples they put in the side of the cabinet by using too long screws to install the sink support blocks or the silicon they got on the oven glass and stainless steel door that I can't get off. Anyone have any ideas about removing dried silicon caulk????)
This is the first time my contractor used them also and he is not happy because I'm not happy. All this unhappiness simply because they didn't ask or didn't train their people to know to ask. That's what bothers me the most. I know what happens when you give people too many choices, but everything else was already decided and it would have been a quick and easy question.
I was told they will run the question on an adjustment up the ladder. I'm not holding my breath. I hope this thread helps others who may not have known like I didn't know.
Joy
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Silicone caulks are readily removed with methylene chloride type paint strippers (read labels for contents). Methylene chloride will also attack many plastics, so use cautiously. Glass and stainless steel should not be affected. HTH
Joe
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