two ladders and a board for scaffold?

Started doing some repairs and painting of fascia and soffit but my knees can't take going up and down a ladder. Would a 1X12X12 between two step ladders work alright for scaffolding?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
al wrote:

yea, unless you fall off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mick wrote:

A 1x12 ain't even close to being strong enough to be safe as a walkboard...
A sound 2x12 would be adequate depending on the weight but will still be pretty "springy"...
As someone else noted, renting or purchasing a walkboard would be a reasonable solution. Also, there is a class of lumber that is ANSI-stamped as "scaffolding-rated" but if OP can even find it locally, it will probably be as expensive if not more than Al scaffold walkboard.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wouldnt use a 1x board because dressed thats only 3\\4 of an inch .If It was me I would go rent a scaffold board of alum or what they may have. But be sure and let them know what u r using it for. builderb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've done it this way, but make sure those ladders are adequately rated for the load, and brace them or secure to house in some way if they seem at all tippy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

A 2x12 will work fine, not a 1x12. If you want to make an excellent plank, use the 2x12 and screw a 2x4 or 2x3 under each edge. This is way stiffer than most aluminum planks. I have a pair made that way that I use when I don't want to get out my 24' aluminum plank.
Run a rope between the ladders to act as a catch rail, or better yet, clamp a 2x4 between them as long as you can get it high enough so it doesn't become its own trip hazard.
Be aware that using a plank between step ladders does not provide sideways stability like ladder jacks would do. Don't push off on the house or the whole thing can topple if not otherwise restrained.
--
Dennis


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7 Sep, 10:22, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMwowway.com (DT) wrote:

re: If you want to make an excellent plank, use the 2x12 and screw a 2x4 or 2x3 under each edge.
I'm sure Dennis meant to add this:
Turn the 2x4 on edge for strength. Lying it flat won't add much stabilty at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I = bh^3/12 = 11.25x0.75^3/12 = 0.396 in^4, s = 1000 psi, c = 0.375", M = sI/c = 1055 in-lb = 6x12W => W = 15 lb.

I = 11.25x1.5^3/12 = 3.16 in^4, s = 1000 psi, c = 0.75", M = 4219 in-lb => W = 59 lb?
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7 Sep 2007 14:32:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote Re Re: two ladders and a board for scaffold?:

Is "c" the deflection at mid-point?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"c" is half the height of the beam, i.e. the distance from the centroid to the extreme fiber.
Cheers, Wayne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
al wrote:

You can use four milk crates cobbled together with wire like this:
X XXX
A lightweight, easily moved, stepping device.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Scafolding is not as safe as having a ladder infront of you, your knees are weak from not being used. a 1x12 is not enough. setting up scaffolding is alot more work than moving a ladder.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
al wrote:

Only if you glue/screw/nail two or three 1x3x12s on edge underneath it.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
al wrote:

Al,
Just make sure someone is video taping you, if you decide to go this route. You may be eligible for a $10k prize, on America's Funniest Videos.
I don't know if $10K would cover the hospital bill though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
YEP.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
YEP if it's a TWO by 12. I mis read that.
s

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds a little risky. The genuine scaffolding is the best choice and well worth the rental fee.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scaffolding would be a much safer option, but wouldn't help with your knee problem. I think it would be very difficult to get good stability with a plank and stepladders, and on a plank you have to rely on agility that your knees may no longer have. I do use a 1x12 on an articulated ladder to work on my boat, but I am not going very high to do that. The articulated ladder supports the board about every three feet. For a longer span, I would want a plank (the planks I have seen flex far less than dimensional lumber, but I suppose adding a strengthening rail to a 2x12 would give good stability, too. The advantage, to me, of a plank is that the length can be varied to fit the job, or the storage area.
Renting an elevating platform would be your best solution as you could ride up and down to just where you want to be. I think some can even be driven along while you are elevated, but I'd rather ride down and check the footing when you have to move more than the length of the platform. A cherry picker would also work, but I think their rental is higher.
al wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.