TV dropped - color problem

Page 2 of 2  
Hi:
What an incredible array of emails. First, he is not a klutz, very athletic, quite coordinated, only 11 years old and was basically unhurt. The TV is very heavy and he could have been hurt quite badly.
Second, I plan on taking the TV in to see if it "can" be serviced. I hope they can improve the quality at minimal cost.
Thanks for your assistance.
Bob
--

******************
This email was checked with anti-virus software before sending.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Choose the shop carefully because some places are staffed almost exclusively with entry level tech school graduates, meaning they don't pay decently enough to retain good technicians. Those places also tend to charge the most. It might be best to go to a place that's worked on several big screen TVs because other shops may not have much experience converging the colors since it's not economical to do with smaller TVs, and smaller TVs also don't have nearly as many convergence problems.
www.repairfaq.org has a great deal of information about electronics repair.
If you look inside the TV yourself, check for any small magnets that may have fallen off. They may look like buttons or be narrow, thin strips of metal. You should be able to see from where they fell by the dust or glue marks, and put them back the exact same orientation because if you flip a magnet around the picture can actually be made worse. Silicone rubber sealer is a good glue for them. It's possible that a rubber wedge that goes between the yoke and picture tube has come off.
Adjusting the color convergence with the ring magnets requires letting the TV warm up for at least 30 minutes and then loosening a locking ring and possibly even cutting through sealer. The voltage and current in the area are high enough to kill, so first read the precautions mentioned in www.repairfaq.org, and don't do the work alone. Better yet, if you're not familiar with working on high voltage devices, don't do anything, and don't assume that you'll be protected by wearing rubber gloves (can actually increase danger if your hands sweat and the gloves have a pinhole break in them). One pair of rings, either at the front or the back, adjusts the red "purity" (make picture all red, adjust until other colors disappear), another pair adjusts the red-blue convergent, the last pair the green-violet convergence. The latter 2 pair are moved together to adjust the horizontal convergence, while changing the angle between each magnet in a pair adjusts it vertically. The alignment will change after the locking ring is retightened.
TVs are front-heavy, so if you can't carry it in its original box and packing, transport it with the front pointing downward and on about 2" of foam padding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 23 Nov 2003, do_not_spam_me wrote:

(snip)
Jesus H, man. I know you were trying to be helpful, but you just wrote him 5 paragraphs of "HOW TO" and buried deep inside of it you whispered "be careful, fatal high voltages present".
The guy obviously has no experience inside of a TV cabinet. I sure hope he took the time to read your buried disclaimer, or his son may be burying him.
--
Baisez-les s'ils ne peuvent pas prendre une plaisanterie
--------------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 08:03:54 -0500, "Localnet"

I'm glad your son is not a klutz and glad he wasnt hurt.
As for service, prepare yourself for a $500 bill. That's why no one repairs electronics anymore. If I cant fix it myself, I trash it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Nov 2003 17:01:16 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@my.com wrote:

Consumer electronics are not worth fixing anymore. There are too many new models coming into the shops all the time for anyone to know them well to make repairs. In any case, with high chip density integration it usually means (an unavailable) chip or PCB replacement.
Try this. Disconnect the power. Open the covers. Reseat all the electrical plug connections, meaning push them in to make sure they are seated properly, Do so especially for the connector at the back of the picture tube. If this doesn't improve the picture good luck.
One more trick you can try with the TV powered on. Use a wood dowel or a long artist brush's handle to jiggle the cables around. If the image is unstable, you have an idea where to look to do a fix. ( eg. a cracked solder pad)
If you feel that you have to adjust something use either a marker pen or "whiteout" to mark the original positions. Pull of the power cord first. If the adjustment doesn't work at least you can restore the original problem.
Don't get freaked out by high voltages. You don't know first hand of anyone with frizzled hair or had died from HV TV shock. This is statistical proof that death by shock is extremely rare. Everyone who works on TV sets and PC Monitors gets zapped sooner or later. Its unpleasant and a lot of excitement the first time. For some reason after being zapped once I never was zapped again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.