Trimming a door to fit

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I just bought a new hollow core door and it is slightly too wide and too tall for the opening (an eighth inch or less). What is the best way for me to trim it enough so that it will fit plus enough for a coat of primer and paint? Thank you in advance for all replies. -- Whenever I hear or think of the song "Great green gobs of greasy grimey gopher guts" I imagine my cat saying; "That sounds REALLY, REALLY good. I'll have some of that!"
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Daniel Prince wrote:

Sharp handplane or surform tool.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

Cheap power plane? http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber‘062
Or, if you have a table saw of sufficient width, and a couple of helpers to keep it straight, you could remove 1/8".
My first guess would be to take the excess off the hinge side.
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HeyBub wrote:

Hi, Snading?
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Tony Hwang wrote:

I prefer gnawing. Unless the object is sub-radiant.
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Hand plane or belt sander.
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On 7/5/2008 9:35 AM Daniel Prince spake thus:

As others have said, a handplane. *Not* a belt sander, and *not* a Surform. Just a good, sharp handplane (the longer the better).
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endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

A surform is, essentially, a form of handplane. The 10" or so float ones are, in fact, a most excellent choice for the purpose, especially for those w/o much experience w/ a regular hand plane. They'll slice the typical veneer quite nicely w/o tearing and don't need any expertise in sharpening that many novice conventional hand plane users may not have.
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True enough, but the Surform will leave a ratty finish. You'll still need to clean up the edge with a plane or by sanding. A sharp jack or jointer plane is a one step process.
R
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RicodJour wrote: ...

Certainly no rattier than a novice w/ an untuned hand plane... :)
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On 7/5/2008 11:49 AM dpb spake thus:

True. A plane *does* take a little skill to operate. It's a skill I recommend that anyone who works with wood should get (and yes, it does include knowing how to sharpen the blade and "tune" the plane).
Now using a hand scraper, that's another essential tool I'm still learning how to use ...
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

And, given the forum and the question, the likelihood of that happening w/ OP is roughly nil; hence the alternate suggestion.
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dpb wrote: ...

Speaking of which, I can't recall where I saw it or exactly who made it, but (I think it was Scandinavian; I'm sure it was European) I have seen an alternative "plane" design that was very similar to a set of hacksaw blades bound together very tightly in a handle. It was reviewed (in FWW iirc where I saw it) w/ accolades as a wood remover that did "ok" work for roughout and dimensioning, similar to surform but somewhat less rough.
And, of course, for relatively small volume w/ the softness of wood in any hollow-core door I've seen, a wood rasp followed up w/ file and a little sanding wouldn't take all that long.
And, while I almost hate to mention it owing to the trouble it can cause if one isn't careful and/or inexperienced, there's always the circular saw w/ a _very_ fine quality ply/veneer blade guided by a straightedge. To take off such a narrow strip means running the saw on the door, of course, which also means protecting the surface and all, but it's certainly "doable" if one has a fair amount of handiness w/ the tool.
I have, even, taken them and run them over the jointer, but I don't recommend that to the neophyte, either... :)
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Are you talking to yourself again? =:0

Japanese. If you'd said the Shinto rasp, I wouldn't have argued. It leaves a better surface than the Surform. http://www.woodworking-magazine.com/blog/CommentView,guid,923d6645-2cf4-4411-bd18-acae2617a81a.aspx
R
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RicodJour wrote: ...

Similar, but not the same as what I'd seen -- don't know which was/is a derivative of the other...
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I think I need to remove more than 1/8 inch. If I removed just 1/8 inch the door would fit very tightly, like a cork, without room for paint.
How much smaller than the opening is a door usually made? How much extra should I allow for paint?
The only plane I have is a Sureform type. I have a circular saw and I have used it with straight edges a few times.
What do you recommend to protect the door surface? Would painter's tape or masking tape be good? -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
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A nickel on the top and a dime on the sides. The usual gap at the bottom would be a 1/2 ". The sides should both be cut at about a 3 degree bevel or you will need more forgiveness to allow the door to close.
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Daniel Prince wrote:

I like to have a 1/8" gap on the hinge side and 3/16" gap on the top and latch sides. The bottom side is whatever clears the carpet.
Notice that the latch side is beveled about 5? so the door will close. Make sure to leave the bevel.
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The objective is to leave a 1/8" gap all the way around the door, maybe a little less in high humidity (summer) and a little tighter during the low humidly (winter). Panel doors don't move quite as much as lap doors. A door that has an even gap, opens/closes effortlessly, and is level and plumb might take some fussing to get it right. If not, you'll be reminded every time you use it. Make sure the rough opening is plumb on both sides and that the top is level--that will help make an easier installation.
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Did you mean to write "a little looser during the low humidly (winter)." ^^^^^^? -- I don't understand why they make gourmet cat foods. I have known many cats in my life and none of them were gourmets. They were all gourmands!
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