Tree wounds

The present consensus is that you do NOT apply any kind of paint, dressing, tar, etc. to a clean saw cut (except for oak trees where there is a threat of oak wilt). But how about irregular scars cause by winds ripping off branches and leaving scars that might be a foot across and two feet top-to-bottom?
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On 11/7/2012 1:31 PM, Rebel1 wrote:

Pretty much the same...if there's broken branch stumps, etc., that can cut back to a clean(er) area, do what can and remove what loose bark, etc., can do to minimize the entrance/hiding places for the invading pests but not too much can do for the scarred (debarked) areas themselves.
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Per the association of arboretum workers: apply protective dressing to large wounds.
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On 11/7/2012 2:09 PM, CRNG wrote:

Per the International Society of Arboriculture, based in Illinois:
"Despite any claims otherwise, research has shown that wood dressings do not reduce decay or speed wound closure and rarely prevent insect or disease infestations. Most experts recommend that wound dressing not be used." http://www.treesaregood.org/treecare/resources/Pruning_YoungTrees.pdf
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No, yes, no? Mommy, make them stop!
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Per the International Society of Arboriculture, based in Illinois:
or disease infestations. Most experts recommend that wound dressing not be used." http://www.treesaregood.org/treecare/resources/Pruning_YoungTrees.pdf
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On 11-07-2012 14:31, Rebel1 wrote:

My oak tree was struck by lightning, leaving a patch of no bark MUCH bigger than that. Nevertheless, it continues to give me lots of exercise every autumn.
--
Wes Groleau

“There are more people worthy of blame
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Rebel1 wrote:

I don't subscribe to the "no-tar" idea.
Arborists should take a few courses in woodworking. Then they might realize that unprotected wood, when exposed to wind, rain, fungus, insects and freeze/thaw cycles will rot unless a protective coating is applied to it.
Any sort of wound caused to a tree that exposes the inner wood will suffer the same effect, which will only stop once (or if) the surrounding bark grows back and covers the exposed area.
Different climates (north/south, damp/dry, urban/rural) will have different effects on this process. Around here, I see smallish boulevard trees with long vertical gaps or wounds that are years old and the trees are fighting a losing battle at growing over them as the inner wood rots, probably made worse from the spray of road salt in the winter.
I have a mature horse chestnut in my backyard that I discovered had a wide section (about 8 inches wide) of dead bark that run from the base and wound it's way up to the top of the trunk (35 - 40 ft). You wouldn't know it from the condition of the outside surface of the bark. I removed this dead bark to reveal some of the surface of the inner wood to be blackened by small amount of fungus, but otherwise the wood looked in good shape. (I also found a few chestnut borer larvae that I smashed with a hammer). I power-washed the exposed wood and then painted the exposed wood with black tree paint all the way up as high as I could reach by climbing into the tree, and now I'm waiting to see how well the tree does to grow over this section of bare wood.
Bottom line: Protect exposed tree wood just as you would for any outdoor lumber (decks, chairs, siding, etc). A clean, intact wood surface will help the tree's living bark to regrow and cover the exposed area.
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On 11/8/2012 7:28 AM, Home Guy wrote: ...

Maybe you should take some courses in horticulture... :)

Indeed, _that's_ what the arborists have said research has shown.
What research has also shown is that there's not compelling evidence coatings have any beneficial effect in aiding the process...
--
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dpb wrote:

So somehow, magically, exposed tree wood doesn't rot or disintegrate due to exposure to weather / climate / insects / fungus and other elements - but your deck or wood siding or wood fence does?
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On 11/8/2012 8:57 AM, Home Guy wrote:

Pretty much, yeah...
The places that rot in construction almost always are owing to things like the joints that hold water and don't dry out, end grain in contact w/ a flooring surface, etc., etc., _not_ just the wood in a vertical orientation.
In the wild the tree will dry out after the rains/snows and generally be just fine. If one sees signs of insect attack or other localized damage that particular problem should be treated appropriately if one is intent on trying to save a specimen but the general use of treatments has not been shown to be of any real benefit in most cases.
--
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