"Tough as Tile" tub paint -- has anyone used this?

This sounds to good to be true, so I assume it is, until I hear otherwise.
Lowe's carries a product called "Tough as Tile" -- an epoxy for use on sinks, tubs, etc. It comes in a spray and a brush-on version, and retails for under 30 bucks.
Given that a professional tub refinish is messy, smelly, toxic, and runs about $600 - $800 bucks, is this a viable alternative? I have two horrifically ugly tubs of 1950's - 1960's vintage. One is a seafoam green but has a nasty ding in it that I can't find touchup paint for, the other is olive green and has really hard lime deposits that NOTHING will remove. If it's as simple as painting it over with this stuff, and it'll work, it might be worth doing it. But I don't want to make it worse.
Anyone have any thoughts on this product?
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scribbled this interesting note:

Nothing is that simple. There is a reason having someone come in and paint your tub is so expensive. It is fairly labor intensive. The cost of the paint is minimal. Even two part epoxy is cheap compared to paying someone who actually knows what he is doing. Ask me. I know. I am now faced with refinishing a tub I paid to have painted about three years ago. The "professional" used a polyurethane paint. Now it has decided to start coming off. In vast sheets. Soon after I paid to have that done, I did a small sink at our house with a two part epoxy paint. The old paint, which was on that sink when we moved in, had continued to chip off so it was time to fix it. What I did was remove the faucet and then remove all the old paint (something the fellow who painted that previously mentioned tub didn't do), fill the minor chips with bondo, and sand. Then I did some more sanding. Then it was time to sand the sink again. After sanding once more, it got cleaned. Then it got wiped out. Then it got a couple of different surface preparations. Then it got cleaned again and again. Then, after masking off everything in that bathroom, it got cleaned one more time and then sprayed. Two or three times. It still looks great.
Now I have to decide, do I want to remove and replace the tub that was previously painted (it has other problems besides that), or patch it up again, remove all the old paint to get back down to original surface, and properly prep and paint it? I'm not yet sure which option would take more time and money.
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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John Willis wrote:

Ok Guys, Is it correct to top-post or bottom-post ;-) I need a lot more info..... steel? porcelain on cast iron? makes a huge difference..... IMHO.... this is MY opinion... nothing beats a high-grade cast iron, with a fired-glass finish (remember, MY OPINION) a keeper, or moving.... quality or trash? (haven't been here in a while... coming back for fun!)
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On 10 Oct 2005 17:02:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com scribbled this interesting note:

You are correct. But sometimes a tub just needs to be spruced up and replacing it is cost prohibitive at that point in time...
-- John Willis snipped-for-privacy@airmail.net (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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best way is to get a drop in liner pretty simple and a lot more durable. I went the pro route smell etc took the guy all day. Well the coating is pretty fragile you have to be very careful as to what kind of cleaner you use. A drop in liner would be a much better choice
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/home_owner_clinic/12752 71.html
About $600.00 according to the article YMMV
Wayne
hackwriter wrote:

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I was told by a pro they don't use epoxy any more because of staining problems but I have no idea whether that was true. Epoxy certainly bonds like nothing else.

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Going over such dark colors will be difficult.It will probably take more than one kit to do it.
From what I've read,a pro etches and then uses a fast-curing bonding agent before spraying on the finish epoxy paint coats.They should tell you how many coats they use for the finish coats.(IMO,minimum three coats.)
I do not believe the home epoxy kits will adhere as well as the pro job,and the pro also gives you cleaning and maintenance instructions.
IMO,go with the pro;you get a guarantee with their work.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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On Mon 10 Oct 2005 05:54:44p, Jim Yanik wrote in alt.home.repair:

My grandmother had a very old Victorian style sink that she didn't want to part with, but it had some serious wear on the porcelain. I used an epoxy paint on it and the results were exceptional. Ten years later it still looked almost as good as the day I did it. IIRC, I did put on 3 applications.
--
Wayne Boatwright **
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hackwriter writes:

"Tough as tile" is a fraudulent statement, for any reasonable definition of "tough" and "tile".
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