toro tractor wont start! please help!!!

Page 2 of 2  


There is a puller tool that uses those holes, it's not terribly expensive, but you could make something I suppose. I have a generic puller that I use, but in the past I've used a piece of steel square stock with a couple of holes drilled into it, rest that on the crankshaft and put the bolts through it into the holes in the flywheel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just found out the engine does not have condenser or points according the the illustrated parts catalog. so i guess that it is either low voltage from the armature or bad timing. i'm going to check both of these.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
93JONK wrote:

That would be their "Magnetron" ignition, it's a small module pressed into the armature, later styles have it built into the assembly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Then it has an ignition module that replaces points condensor and can cost 40-100$, And it has a coil, start with the plug wire- coil, it can be Ohm checked, If you just do the replace everything deal, you may replace everything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
First try the sparkplug gap trick. When voltage is low the spark cannot make the large jump. Decreasing the jump can get a small spark through. Usually, any spark that can jump the gap (when installed in the cylinder) will run an engine, although it will not run well at low loads.
I assure you that if you pull the flywheel/magneto off you will immediately see the condenser and the points. You cannot really check the condenser. Check out the points for being properly adjusted (gapped), and pitting. If this were my machine, since I'd gone through all the work of getting the flywheel off I'd replace the condenser and points regardless of apparent condition.
I'D ALSO REPLACE THE FLYWHEEL KEY SINCE THIS HAS CAUSED SIMILAR PROBLEMS FOR ME IN THE PAST. If the key is partly sheared then the spark timing can get messed up. The key can partially shear (without completely breaking) if the blade stops very abruptly, like when hitting large rocks etc.
HTH
EJ in NJ
93JONK wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ernie Willson wrote:

Happens in conventional mowers, but is unlikely in a tractor as the blade is not directly driven. If you replace it, do use a proper aluminum key, a steel key defeats the purpose.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Before going on and replacing all the hard expensive stuff first do more basic stuff, I have seen a plug that will fire out of the motor and even in the motor but it wont take any load since a lousy plug wire was bad. To fire gas, start, run on choke and accelerate takes more juice than to idle. A bad wire, plug, corroded connection, can make it not get volts when needed, under load, it just happened to my car, one cilinder missing under load, it was a bad plug wire. An old machine, I would wonder about the flywheel key, it sets timing, if they hit enough rocks that might be the issue, timing off.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.