Toilet supply line ruptured

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Robert Allison wrote:

My just open up, the supply line cracked, and I was the one who caused the problem. I am a recent amputee and when I use the toilet allot of the times I have to use my knee to balance my self to complete the job at hand.
So I do move the toilet every once in a while. :-(
I replaced the ridged pipe with a braided flexible supply line.
--
Moe Jones
HVAC Service Technician
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Not so unusual, it happened to me as well. I came home to the sound of water running from upstairs, found out it was the plastic nut on the toilet end of the water feed line that fractured. I guess the plastic crosslinks and becomes brittle over time, and the stress on its threads eventually becomes too much for the brittle plastic to bear. Fortunately for me, the water ran across the bathroom floor, into the floor vent, down the ducts into the basement, where the ductwork turned 90 degrees, but the water ran out of a convenient hole in the bottom of the duct, right into a floor drain :)
-Chris
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wrote:

it was designed to do that. was the architect rube & goldberg?
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Damn, Talk about luck! Our bathroom floor is somewhat canted toward the tub from the toilet. When the plastic nut came loose the water shot up toward the tank and of course ran down across the floor to tub ran along the tub and right under the only 4" piece of sheetrock , under and through that down to the cavity that the tub sits in. By luck there is a notch in a beam the water ran down the notch and welled up in the ceiling of the kitchen. I assume that the water also ran along the electric wire and into the ceiling fan, which caused the fan motor to short out. Waiting for ins adjuster to come out on Wed. What should I expect? We've never made a claim before and my policy is written in lawyerese. It says that I am covered which I should be. I am covered at 100%. Will they make me hire someone, will they only pay me for materials if I choose to do the repair myself.
I know I will be able to ask these questions of the adjuster, but any prior insight may be to my benefit as to what to say and ask or what not to say or ask.
SD
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S H O P D O G wrote:

The floor's not lost!
Mine got double-wet due to a leaky water heater. I just left it alone for a couple of months, then re-glued the tiles. Worked out okay.
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Oh yeah,the floors a goner! where the tiles meet they are trying to stand up. One just broke, so I removed it and it looks like the mastic has seperated from the tiles. If anythng comes out of this we were going to replace that floor in the future anyway. But I would have rather not gone about it this way! Most of the first floor is dry and the basement is almost dry.
Now, I'm concerned about all this old timber. Now that it has gotten completely saturated, will there be any issues with mold. The house is about 70 years old.
sd
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S H O P D O G wrote:

Right. The wood swelled. As it dries, it will shrink back to its original size.
Because it popped loose, you may have to re-glue some (all) of the tiles, but the floor is NOT a goner.

Probably not. A one-time wetting isn't usually enough for mold.
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In my area (Chicago suburbs) the toilet supply must be done with soft copper and compression fittings. And if an actual plumber is installing your faucets he has to use soft copper there too. Only homeowners can get away with using the hoses. That is, if you want to be up to code or pass an inspection.
They now make little alarms that will ring when water contacts them, handy for under sinks and toilets, sump pumps, floor drains, etc. to wake you up to problems before they become catastrophes.
Heres are a bunch of them, considering your story they are probably worth it:
http://www.smarthome.com/_/ProductResults.aspx?Ntt=water%20leak%20detactor
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Or this one which meters a "running toilet" and says "enough is enough":
http://www.smarthome.com/7121.html
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