Toilet seat wrench?

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Is there a deep wrench socket that will fit the plastic nuts that come with toilet seats these days?
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Make your own, from 1/2 inch copper tubing.
Slot one end, solder a tee at the other end for a handle.
http://d21c.com/krnspn/MISC/TOOLS/toilet-seat_nut-remover1.jpg
http://d21c.com/krnspn/MISC/TOOLS/toilet-seat_nut-remover2.jpg
http://d21c.com/krnspn/MISC/TOOLS/toilet-seat_nut-remover3.jpg
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We called them shmucks. We used them in the convention industry for wing nuts. Take a piece of 1/2" conduit about four inches long. Cut a transverse groove in one end so that it fits over the wing nuts wings. Add a piece of garden hose that can be slid on there after being heated in very hot water in a microwave, or just glue on an oversized piece. This is to make it a little larger in diameter and ease the wear and tear on hands. Increases traction, too.
Simple, cheap, and works good.
Steve
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On Sat, 21 May 2011 19:11:40 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"
That's what I do, and I use my fingers for the nut.
That's on my own toilet seat. If it were someone else's, I make him or her use his own fingers.
Not that the nut itself is dirty, but your hand could conceivably get dirty.
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This particular toilet seat, a Bemis, did not have a screwdriver slot. Instead, it fastened by threaded rods, which were screwed into the metal hinge pieces from below, and tightened in place by the plastic nuts. When new, the rods kept loosening in the hinge pieces, with no good way to tighten them; when the metal hinge broke, however, they had rusted or corroded into place. In my cramped bathroom, with the toilet I have, it is very difficult to grasp the nuts from below by hand or with a Vise-Grip.
It turns out that there are a couple of wrenches on the market designed to fit the plastic nut. I got one at Home Depot, but its well does not go deep enough for the unusually long threaded rods that came with the Bemis (the others I found on the Web seem to have the same problem). I wound up having to cut the rod with a hacksaw just below the hinge hardware. But the toilet seat wrench I bought was very helpful in installing my new toilet seat.
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if bolt is plastic its far faster to ccut it off with a hacksaw or hacksaw blade if space is tight
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I had a Bemis that did the same thing...I had to drill it out from the top. Not a bad job because it seems to be made of some king of cheap pot metal. Mine was one of the lids that drops slowly. Came apart in about two years.
Jimmie
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wrote:

That's why I keep latex gloves around. Makes those icky jobs easier.
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On 5/22/2011 7:41 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

It won't be any dirtier than it gets when you normally use the toilet. Geez, people get such germ phobias. At work, there is a constant pile of towels inside the bathroom door from people afraid to touch the handle. But they have no qualms about touching the elevator button 20 feet away, which at lunchtime is mainly pressed by people that just walked out of the bathroom.
--
aem sends...

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It is a proven fact that the dirtiest germiest nastiest item in the house is the sponge or washing thingie in the kitchen sink. I have seen a lot of people do all sorts of things to clean and keep their kitchen areas clean, yet use one of those five for a dollar at the Dollar Store for so long, the scrubbie part comes off.
I did a convention that had a lot of NSF stuff, the theme of the convention being hygienic public equipment. There are actually no touch bathrooms where one can go in, and not touch any item that anyone has touched beside them. Sensors everywhere. Still, like you, I think that they would eventually touch something.
I don't know if it's like this at your house, but at mine, I think the nastiest dirtiest things are the grandkids. Yes, they take a bath every day, and all, but they come in contact with some heavy stuff every day at school, and it always seems like we come down with something while they are here, or shortly after they leave.
But we love to have them come. They will spend two weeks with us twice this summer, and now they are 6 and 8. Both boys. I love yanking their chain, and they know that they shouldn't take me serious sometimes. But I do get them on some practical jokes. We just found out that the small stream near us has small fish, so this summer is going to be a lot of fun just walking to the creek.
I did Scouts for many years, and there's just a smell when you walk into a Scout meeting of little boys. A cross between peanut butter and insufficiently wiped hinies. There was some film where two little boys were hiding from witches at a witch convention, and the witches said, "I smell little boys."
Duh................
Steve
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re: "It is a proven fact that the dirtiest germiest nastiest item in the house is the sponge or washing thingie in the kitchen sink."
Not in all houses.
A regular nuking of a damp sponge as part of the kitchen cleaning process will keep the sponge germ free. After I'm done using the sponge (no, not every time) I toss it in the microwave for a couple of minutes.
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/university-of-florida/4112-nuke-your-sponge-video.htm
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wrote:

I have some in the basement but I never use them.

I'm not worried about germs. It's just disgusting. Even my own toilet a little bit, but I get over that within a few seconds.

Ewwwwww. I'm not coming to your buliding.
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Bingo!
Used to be latex gloves were insanely expensive. Now, you can get many different kinds/grades at most any hospital/medical supply store for a reasonable price. I've worn high quality left/right number sized $1 ea clean-room gloves and these are as good as any I've used:
http://tinyurl.com/3tql2ne
I pay $15 box, locally, and still consider it an excellent bargain.
nb
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exposure to dirty stuff helps keep humans healthy, by keeping our immune systems working
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wrote:

I'm sure that does at the start, for the first 10 years, or 20, or 50, and I agree 100% about that time, but there may an age where it starts to work the other way.
Are there really kids who don't play in the dirt now. I had a sandbox with no bottom, so when I got past the sane, there was only dirt. (although I never went deeper than an inch, I got plenty of dirt and grass and bushes elsewhere. Maybe that's why I'm not allergic to anything. When I was 19, I was allergic to pHisoHex, the skin cleaner with hexachlorophene, that now requires a prescription, but after a year or so I got over it. It's good to prevent pimples, but not shaving with an electric razor is even better. Growing a beard might be beter yet, for boys.)
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On 5/22/2011 5:10 PM, mm wrote: (snip)
Growing a beard might

Nit-pick time. You don't GROW a beard- it isn't like planting flowers. You just stop scraping it off at skin level every day.
(Yeah, I know, that is the common usage, but I cringe every time I hear it. Also cringe-worthy is 'clean shaven', as if people who don't care to shave are 'unclean'.)
--
aem sends....

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Planting flowers doesn't grow them, either. They grow on their own.

No, I cut them off an inch or so above the skin every day. ;-)

I suppose you don't much care for the phrase "shot his head clean off" much, either. ;-)
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wrote:

I hate "grow the business" and "grow the economy".

When I stopped shaving, I thought I would be less clean, because it woudl be it would be harder to wash my face, and I'd get more pimples. I had the beard for about three months, and when I shaved it off, my skin was almost perfect and the pimples never came back to the extent they had been. (They were never terrible and never left pocks, but they much fewer after the beard.)
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I've heard that nookie will clear that up, too.
Steve
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wrote:

Maybe he got more nookie with the beard. SWMBO would shoot me if I shaved mine. ;-)
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