to all you chubby guys out there

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On 11/17/2014 7:07 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Now you tell me. I just put a bag of chips in the collection basket.
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On 11/17/2014 7:39 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

I want to see when you go on Slimfast diet.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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So you've never seen or heard of an automatic transmission?
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I'm fat and I have a bad back, and until I read this it never occurred to me to get a handicapped sticker.
My plan was to lose weight and fix my back. Or is it possible if I lose weight, the back problem will go away? I was 270, now 245. To be slim I should be 160.
I also get a shopping cart in the parking lot, to lean on when I walk to the store. I used to get one anyhow, but now I lean on it.
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Yes, with that weight it's almost certain that your back will feel better.
I'm not overweight now, but back in my 40s I was 30 lbs over or so. My back hurt a lot. Doctors blamed early arthritis.
So, around age 50 I built a deck and a patio. I moved tons of material in the process and forever cured my bad back. Almost 70 now.

So sad.
Do something.
I'm swimming 3 times a week. Getting even trimmer and stronger. I don't expect any chances to do this life over.
--
Dan Espen

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I've wondered about that. I figured it would be high, but didn't realize it was that high. Good link. Thanks.
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wrote:

Some do, some don't. A few years back I worked a weekend a month doing some work that required me to go to the homes of lot of people with disability. Amazing the type of people I saw.
Many were decades long smokers with COPD or other respiratory problems. Others had heart problems, joint problems, and diseases like MS, MD, and things they had no control over.
Yes, many were overweight, but that was recent. I'd see a photo of the patient on the mantle. He'd be middle aged, slender, and it good health. What happens though, they become physically impaired and restricted in what they can do. Unfortunately, it leads to still eating at the same pace as their former active bodies and maybe adding in a few snacks from boredom.
A few of these people were lazy welfare types that never did anything worthwhile to contribute to society. The vast majority though, were middle class people that worked at good jobs requiring some skills. These were shipbuilders, machinists, business owners, teachers. Then they got hit with a problem and became the overweight scooter guy at WalMart.
It can happen to anyone. Be thankful for your good health and I hope you never need a handicap placard. But don't assume you never will...stuff happens.
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On 11/16/2014 12:10 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Sure, it could happen after an injury but it certainly won't happen because I'm stuffing my face with McJunk Food.
You'll typically see the oinkers in the high carbohydrate isles and seldom in the fresh vegetable section. Why is that?
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I've been a little disappointed. The orthopedist should have said that to me. OTOH, he thought I'd be back in two weeks after the MRI. He didnt' expect the MRI would take me 10 months. OT3H, even a last month's appt. he didn't bring up weight. I did. Once I did, he heartily agreed. He said one pound off the belly is like 5 pounds off the back, so my 20 pounds at the time was like 100 pounds !!.

That's what I"m talking about. Did he tell you to lose weight?
(It's not like I didn't know I should lose weight, which first became a real problem about 5 years ago, but to have confidence in the doctor, I want to hear him say it.)

Did you also lose the 30 pounds?
My house is too small for really big projects, and now that winter is here, even fence repair is on hold.

I am. I've lost 25 pounds and with this method, I don't expect I'll stop losing before I should. I eat anything I want, I just notice when I'm full and I stop. I can feel the difference from the 25 lbs, going up the stairs, and probably walking longer.

No I don't want a sticker. And actually, I've eaten more at fast food than before (when I ate practically nothing there. I was up to about three times a month for a while.) Have you heard about the guy, Jared, who lost 100 pounds or more at Subway. That food is probably better for you than McD but I think more important is that people who don't keep much food in the house and eat at moderate sized meals at restaurants, and only eat at the restaurant and don't nosh all day, are going to lose weight if they're overweight. I took a vacation 6 years ago, stayed in a dorm (at age 61), walked quite a bit, and only ate when they served lunch or dinner, except for the big candy bar I ate every day, and I lost 15 pounds in about 2 months. The next year I got sick and was bed-ridden except for meals for almost 3 months, and that was when it got bad.

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On 11/16/14, 12:29 PM, micky wrote:

http://www.dietdoctor.com/the-1-cause-of-obesity-insulin
For more than 10 years, I've been mixing 250mg of magnesium in a pint of water and keeping it in a sports water bottle by the sink. You can take magnesium supplements, but the trick is to absorb it. If it's dilute and I drink it when I'm thirsty, I seem to absorb it well. (Nowadays, some say the RDA for men should be 1000mg of magnesium a day.)
Obese children have less blood magnesium than children of normal weight. During the 20th Century, the average magnesium intake of Americans dropped by half, and we probably weren't getting enough in 1900.
Without enough magnesium, insulin stays in the blood, turning sugar into fat and making you hungry for more. Magnesium helps insulin get into cells, where it burns sugar to gives you energy. It gives me energy. It also cured my lifelong sweet tooth. One cookie is enough.
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The quacks are interested in selling you drugs and/or medical services first. A cure is second; and a cure that doesn't bring them any $$ (e.g. losing weight, wise nutrition) is a very distant third.
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Nope.
But I don't attribute the lack of back pain to weight loss. More it was the hard work. Basically I spent about 30 days doing heavy labor, operating a jack hammer, carting off chunks of cement, digging the patio down another 6 inches, and moving 23,000 pounds of rocks and sand.

Yes, I'm just about 30 pounds lighter. I've gained a bit of muscle too. By the weight charts, I should still loose weight, but my doctor told me recently that he saw no reason for me to loose any more weight.

Fencing is a good one. I put in 230 feet of hand built fence (using deck boards) a few years after the deck. Felt great afterwards.

Sounds good. I'm the take it home guy at restaurants. I see people finish meals when eating out and have no idea how they do it.

Thanks.
I think doctors hesitate to bring up weight. They don't want to hurt the patients feelings, and it's so hard to get people to actually change.
I find that after I've taken a few bites at a meal I'm not hungry any more. I think people finish their meals, not out of hunger, but habit.
Hey, went swimming this morning. When I woke up I was thinking of all kinds of reasons why I didn't have to go today. I pushed myself and now feel a lot better.
--
Dan Espen

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There is that, but I think they just don't want to embark on a thankless task. Ever try to convince someone to eat less or exercise more?
Face it, we all know extra weight isn't good for us. We don't need anyone to tell us.
--
Dan Espen

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On 11/16/2014 2:14 PM, Dan Espen wrote:

I have trouble convincing myself, let alone others. My goal is to lose 20# over the next four to six months. Should be easy, but it is not,, especially as we get older.

Yep.
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Well put, Ed.
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wrote:

The obvious answer is because chips and dip taste better than broccoli. Many of those people have never been given any education on nutrition by either schools or parents. The snack guys advertise on TV every day, the veggie farmers do not.
Also, it seems the lower the education, the lower the knowledge. It will take a few generations to turn it around.
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I challenge this. People see what they think they are going to see. Just like interviewees and even repliers here reply to the question they think was asked, based on the first few words of the question.

But on the chance he's right, I don't konw how other fat people grew up, but it seems reasonal\ble to say that it's not just education about nutrition but what they grew up eating. Whatever my mother cooked, I learned to like (with one exception). She never bought soda pop, so I don't drink it now. She never offered chips or pretzels etc. so I don't eat them now. She did make popcorn (she even sent away for a Jiffy-Pop stove popcorn maker, which I still have) with a little butyter, and I've gone through periods where I eat a lot of popcorn, drenched in butter if possible.

Plus there's research that shows that simple sugars are more satisfying,than proteins, even to infants.

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On 11/17/14, 12:57 PM, micky wrote:

My mother never bought soda, but I loved it. I must have been about 7th grade when Pepsi went from 6 oz to 10 oz. If I had a dime, that bigger bottle was bliss! In the past, it seems most people thought that was too much.
In my teens, I'd drink a quart bottle of soda for coffee break. Decades later, 2-liter bottles came out. Once or twice a year, I'd treat myself. I figured it should last a week, but it would be gone in 24 hours. As I rarely bought it, I wasn't addicted. I wondered what compelled me to keep drinking it.
After I started supplementing my magnesium, sweet stuff at the store didn't tempt me. I no longer bought soda. If a host offered me soda, one was plenty. I also found I wanted only little servings of pasta or white rice.
Magnesium improved my response to sugar. My cells would quickly be satisfied. More soda or pasta would have felt like too much. Sweets on store shelves didn't tempt me because more magnesium meant less insulin in my blood turning sugar to fat. My blood sugar didn't dip, so I didn't want sweets. (Well, I like a teaspoon of sugar in my coffee. Come to think of it, I'll bet it would taste as good without the sugar!)
My occasional soda gluttony wasn't from habit, upbringing, or advertising. It came from a poor response to sugar. My cells didn't feel particularly satisfied. Insulin would turn it to fat, so in a couple of hours I'd crave another glass of sweet soda.
I met my neighbor's father when he came to help my neighbor rake leaves. He wasn't a pound overweight. He had the energy of a teen and more stamina. He was 93. I finally learned his secret. Every week, he'd have a bath in epsom salt. That's how people used to supplement their magnesium, before the medical industry dumbed everybody down.
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On 11/17/2014 12:57 PM, micky wrote:

Grocery stores are generally divided into three sections - fresh produce, refrigerated foods and everything else.
The produce section is generally the most healthy for you. The refrigerated section is a mixture of healthy and unhealthy. The "everything else" isles are mostly high-calorie low-nutrient processed foods that smart people avoid.
While there are rare exceptions, you will seldom see an obesecycle in the fresh produce section of any store. Obesecycles are drawn to the high-sugar and wheat junk food isles.
But don't take my word for it, have a peek:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwEGSe_upuQ

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On 11/18/14, 4:56 AM, Taxpayer wrote:

Fruits are made of acid to rot your teeth and sugar to cause diabetes and obesity.
Vegetables are full of carcinogens and toxins. They're carriers of cyclospora, e coli, hepatitis A, listeria monocytogenes, noroviruses, salmonella, and shigella.
Not being cattle, humans can't get nutrition from raw vegetables, like the ones in the produce section. Those raw vegetables have enzymes racing to rot them before you can cook them.

Hot dogs don't really need to be refrigerated because they contain sodium nitrate. Unlike vegetables, they're nutritious raw.

Buy spinach in the produce section and you'll pay about $5 a pound, and its enzymes may rot it before you get it home. Buy it in the "everything else" section and you'll pay about 80 cents a pound. Even after you open the can, it will outlast fresh spinach because the enzymes have been dealt with. So have the pathogens.
Look for beans in the "everything else" section. If the Good Lord hadn't meant us to eat them, he wouldn't have invented the pressure cooker. Their glycemic index is very low, meaning they give you energy over a long time instead of spiking blood sugar. They're a good source of magnesium and potassium.
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