Thoughts and concerns / design ideas for using a grill on a deck?

I am building a new deck (hopefully myself) and will be using the new blended (part wood, part plastic) decking material that has been on the market a few years now. Currently our BBQ grill, which I use every day in the mild and warm months is out the back door, down the upper & lower deck, down a small set of steps onto a concrete patio near our garage. Total distance and steps 40 ft plus 15 stair steps. My wife would like it closer to the house on the upper deck so she could help with the cooking more easily. I would like any and all thoughts on this; I wouldn't mind the shorter walk, but would need to design in safety features to allow safety, prevent fire and deck damage but still be attractive in appearance. I am sure someone has approached this challenge before. The current grill which is very functional is a typical portable propane on a rolling cart ($200 ish). I am not opposed to spending more on a grill if necessary to meet the long term safety and appearance issues for the deck.
Thanks in advance -- Any and all advice welcome. I am looking for concerns and ideas regarding both the deck and the grill. Also, how close to the siding on the home is it reasonable to have the grill?
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1_Patriotic_Guy wrote: Also, how

Place your grill on the far edge of the deck, oppisite from the house. This offers the best protection, not only for the siding, but also away from any overhanging eves.
I've seen a handful of failed regulators on gas grills, and the resulting fire will destroy a house in minutes.
Larry
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Exactly what happens when a regulator fails? Is this when the grill is lit, or just sitting there between uses? In general what makes a regulator fail?
Thanks in advance

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We have some good friends who piped their grill to natural gas and had it protected under the eave overhang. Something went wrong and they needed to replace some brick and eave. Due to their experience, I would not keep it under the eave.
If you are worried about stains on the deck, you might consider a sheet of Hardie siding (comes in 4x8 and 4x10) under the grill. If and when it is stained, replace it instead of deck boards.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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How close depends on how big the inevitalbe flare up will be. Put he grill on the far side of the deck out in the open. No way would I put mine against the house or under an eave or near a window.
My grill has been on the deck for 25 years with no problems. But, stuff happens and flare-ups do happen. Mine is only inches from the deck rail and has not caused any overheating or burning problem. Being in the open, there is no grease or smoke splatters on the house either.
Rare, but it does happen that a propane tanks gets on fire or a grill otherwise loses control. With 12' to the house, it minimizes any potential problems. Next to the house could end up costing the house.
Next is a good grill. For the $200 it will cook a burnger, for for anything more serious, look at Vermont Castings, BroilMaster, MHP or Weber. They are far superior to cook with. Plan to spend $600 to $1500
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Good Grief! Do you barbecue like my father-in-law? When he gets out the charcoal starter, even the dog runs.
But, if you use a propane grill, and keep it at least a few (6) feet away from everything, it should be okay. I have mine under my patio, and it doesn't flare up enough to ever discolor the underneath, like a charcoal grill would. You might consider putting an accessory area with table, sink, cutting board, dorm fridge, microwave, storage and steel plated area for Dutch Oven cooking. Not necessarily every one of those things, but those you use the most. A lot of those things can be seasonal and modular so you can put them away in your winters. An overhead weather guard in the form of a small roof is good when you want to cook and the weather doesn't want you to.
Think ahead. Plan. Do it once, do it right. I, personally would put it on the outside edge of the deck,as far away from the siding as possible.
Steve
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