Thinner alternative to drywall?

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I'm changing out my kitchen ovens and the new one needs an additional 3/8 to 1/2" of side clearance. It is a sheetrocked wall, 1/2". Because it will be hidden doesn't matter about looks. The oven is rated to be installed in wood cabinets with essentially zero clearance. Some options that come to mind:
1 - Remove the drywall and trim the studs down by 1/2" over the full height of the wall using a router? Other ideas? Then re-drywall. The wall is non-load bearing.
2 - Just leave the one section of hidden wall where the ovens are without drywall. It's just a short wall, not open to anywhere above or below and will never be seen.
3 - Same as two but use sheetmetal to cover the studs.
4 - Other ideas? Is there some other product that is thin and can be used instead of sheetrock for something like this?
Thanks for any input!
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replace 1/2 inch drywall with 5/8ths
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On 1/10/2012 9:11 AM, bob haller wrote:

so, adding thickness is going to help him gain space how?
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Steve Barker
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wrote:

replace 1/2 inch drywall with 5/8ths
Bob.... You flunked in math?????????? ww
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He wants thinner, not thicker
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wrote:

_____________ Bob probably meant to type 3/8". I cant speak for him, but personally I am severely dyslexic and would have made the same mistake a dozen times. lol!
CC
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On 1/11/2012 9:43 AM, ChrisCoaster wrote:

even if so, that still would have only gained ONE EIGHTH inch. Not to mention there is no such thing as 3/8" drywall readily available anymore. Knowing bob, he was spouting off about fire protection again. Shit he knows nothing about.
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On 1/10/2012 8:40 AM, Bill Ventura wrote:

sheet metal or bare studs would work for me.
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Bill Ventura wrote the following:

How about a formica panel, the kind used to cover counter tops? It's abour 1/8" thick. I lined a laundry chute from the bathroom on the second floor to the laundry room below.
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Bill
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Use 1/4" Duroc. Permabase, or whatever, cement board. You may trust a zero clearance oven, but in case there is a code conflict the cement board will likely pass. Otherwise, some 20 gauge galvanized wold be a good choice.
Joe
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Bill Ventura wrote:

Ideas 2 and 3 seem like they would probably work if you want to do them.
For Idea 1, maybe another option would be to: remove the existing sheetrock; sister 2x3 studs next to the existing 2x4 studs; cut the existing 2x4's down to the level of the 2x3's with a circular saw and/or Sawzall; the re-sheetrock with 1/2-inch sheetrock. Or, if you have access to both sides if the existing wall, maybe tear it down and rebuild it with 2x3's and sheetrock both sides with 1/2-inch sheetrock.
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A variation is to remove the old drywall and add your "sisters" so that they are 1/2" below the studs. Cut the new drywall to fit between the old studs.
On the finished wall you wall have 1.75" of wood and 14.25" of drywall. The OP can either paint everything the same color or use a different color on the wood.
Alternatively, set the drywall base 1" behind the studs. If 2x3 "sisters" are used, the OP could use 5/8" drywall. Small sections of drywall might "flex" a bit so the extra thickness might be helpful.

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John Gilmer wrote:

That's an interesting idea. It would be easier than my idea, and it would leave him with an enclosed wall next to the oven. Also, with the idea that I had suggested, I forgot to include that the OP would have to cut back the top plate and bottom plate, which may not be to easy to do.
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Bill Ventura wrote:

One of the biggest rationales for using drywall is its fire retardant capability. Bear this in mind as you search for a substitute.
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Good point.
"Sisters on the drywall with drywall in between will make it more difficult to ignite the 2x4 studs over being exposed. Perhaps not as good a 1/2" over the studs but ...
One reason drywall resists fire is that the gypsum retails a heck of a lot of water. The fire has to "dry out" the gypsum before it can get much above the boiling temperature of water and that's WAY below what it takes to set the wood on fire.
N.B.: "Fire Resistant" safes often use gypsum in the space between the outer wall and the inner wall. Stuff a wall cavity with drywall sheets would provide some fire protection.
ALSO, there are fire retardant paints that might be applied to the wood.
Like it or not, in a typical house/office the fuel usually comes from the belongings of the owner/tenants. Books, paper, and most furniture and office equipment can provide fuel.

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Tempered hardboard or 1/4" plywood come to mind.
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 11:50:02 -0700, chaniarts

He needs 1/8 - and THAT is available. So is mahogany door skin plywood.
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On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 08:40:57 -0800 (PST), Bill Ventura

That is a good option. In spite of the zero clearance rating, I'd like to see sheetrock next to my ovens and continue to meet fire codes.
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Or, since this is a very small area: Remove old drywall. Cut new drywall to size to fit between studs and flush with them. Tape and joint compound, paint the wall.
It will be impossible to tell the entire space is not drywall. You haven't compromised any of the strength, and you've put back much of the fire protection.
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But you do have wood exposed to the oven. Sheet metal is better than that, I would cut back the studs and then redrywall to meet any fire code questions. You wouldn't want a fire and then have insurance denied because there was no drywall.
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