The odor from spoiled food

My freezer failed and most of the food spoiled. The freezer has been repaired and has been with 409, Lysol, and bleach. But an odor is still present. I have poured an ounce of bleach into the drip pan (which is unaccessible except through the drain) daily.
Any ideas?
Dick
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This subject came up last week, also with regard to a failed freezer. Someone said:
"Two of these http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=1&p175&cat=2,42194,40727 cleared the smell of gasoline from inside my van in four days."
Might be worth a try. And, from now one, always assume the freezer will fail. Wrap things so that even if they defrost, they won't leak all over the place. Hefty makes a jumbo size freezer bag. Even when I do a perfect job of wrapping things in freezer paper, I store the stuff in those bags.
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I have ordered this product and am awaiting delivery.

Double and triple wrap is my new protocol.
What about the wall to get the odor out of the plaster board.
Dick
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wrote:

Did the plasterboard actually get soaked with anything disgusting, or is it just smelly from being nearby the disaster? If it actually got wet, I'd cut out the affected area and patch it.
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On Mon 21 Jan 2008 09:20:06p, Dick Adams told us...

Baking soda? Activated charcoal? Ozone generator?
--
Wayne Boatwright

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Done first, ordered second, please explain third.
Dick
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On Tue, 22 Jan 2008 10:55:25 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:
-snip-

The workhorse I use which kills bacteria & somehow makes pet & smoke odors go away is Alpine air's ionizer- There are lots on ebay, new and used- This item number says MSRP is $999 & he's selling them for $220 +30.
I've bought 2 used ones for about $100 each-- my brother-in-law had a guy come to his house and sell him 2 for $6-700. [both still running fine after several years of use]
My son uses the same model when cleaning cars bought at auction that might have some odd odors. An overnight with an ionizer & they smell like springtime in the rockies.
Jim
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On Tue 22 Jan 2008 07:16:15a, Jim Elbrecht told us...

Exactly. I have two of them that have been in use for use for nearly 10 years. We are both smokers, but non-smokers coming into our house don't detect the smell of smoke. These units will eradicate just about any odor.
Decomp teams use commerial units of this type to rid the odor of death.
--
Wayne Boatwright

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Dear Dick Adams:
On Jan 22, 3:55am, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:
...

Odor molecules are commonly carbon-carbon double bonds. Ozone breaks these bonds, almost always to compounds that are easily assimilated by nature, are non-toxic to humans (with caveats), and no longer smell.
Douse the inside with water and put an ozone generator output hose into it. Some rental companies might have these for remediation after fire or flood. The water is to increase the humidity in the space, ozone goes after more compounds with water present. Standing water not required / desirable.
Depending on the ozone generator, 30 seconds to 30 minutes should be enough, not longer. Do not stay near the freezer, and do this outside. In fact if you can, keep the ozone generator away from the freezer.
After the generator is off, and it sits for an hour, blow a fan into the space to loft the ozone (heavier than air) out of the chest (if it is not an upright freezer).
Have you replaced the pliable plastic seals? They tend to hold onto odors. Certainly and salt (a couple of tablespoonfuls per gallon) and hydrogen peroxide solution (a 1/2 or 3/4 liter bottle in a gallon) would be good to rub it down with (remember gloves). Its reaction will be pretty quick, so a rinse with water within 5 minutes should be good.
David A. Smith
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wrote:

Google ozone. Ozone's chemical sign is 03, which means it is oxygen (02) with an additional oxygen molecules. You can smell it when around an electric motor, and the larger the motor, the more ozone. It has a sweet smell, and not unpleasant. I'm sure you've smelled it in your life. It breaks down very easily by losing one oxygen molecule when it hits another molecule or compound. (the smelly ones) This changes the chemical composition of the smelly molecule into a molecule that doesn't smell, or two molecules that don't smell. They've been used for a long time by restoration companies, and as stated, four hours to a few days will get rid of just about any smell. ANY smell. They're a convenient thing to have, and I'd buy one in a heartbeat if I saw it at a yard sale or cheap. Am going to investigate that cheap one the poster said on ebay. Use it after Uncle Cletus comes for a visit. Cigars, farts, his weird smell .........
Steve
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True for universal motors, with arcing brushes. But induction motors have no brushes, no arcs, and produce no ozone. Not much point in sniffing around them.
You can sometimes smell ozone in the air after a thunderstorm.
    Dave
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writes:

Just trying to pass along some information. But, I see it was wasted on those who already know everything.
Steve
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Dick Adams wrote:

Next door neighbors house was ozonized. I'd be careful with ozone and bleach because both can damage plastics. Plastics do absorb odors and tend to hang on to them like they do plasticizers. Time, airing and use of charcoal hopefully will make odor manageable.
Frank
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On Jan 21, 8:20 pm, snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote:

Dick-
It's gonna take some time. :(
My BIL left some trout in our freezer (wrapped in foli).... no freezer failure but the package must have leaked.
It took WEEKS of plates of ground coffee, alternated with activated carbon.
We were never sure what really did the trick...IMO it was just time & maybe the activated carbon.
cheers Bob
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We bought a used fifth-wheel travel trailer in which food had been allowed to spoil in the 'fridge. We put in several shallow dishes of raw coffee (right out of the can) and changed them in about a week. Did it the second time and the odor was gone. Hope this helps. Bob-tx
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote in

Wash down the inside of the freezer with cider vinegar.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote in

I forgot to write this - If you don't have any small kids in the family to knock them over:
1. Set out a couple of small bowls about half way with cider vinegar. You can leave them out on the counter until the vinegar is gone. Refill and repeat if necessary. You may have smells that have gotten out of the freezer and into the room.
2. Put a couple more cider vinegar bowls in the fridge portion. Not sure, but won't the air from the fridge circulate to the freezer(?). Anyway, it'll keep down the smells.
I've used cider vinegar a number of times for awful smells. Once, a skunk sprayed outside, but right under an open window and the smell was all over the house. I set out bowls and kept refilling them for almost a week and got rid of the odor.
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snipped-for-privacy@panix.com (Dick Adams) wrote in

bacterial enzyme cleaner
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