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snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com ( snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com) says...

Much to their surprise, they will find out that at least 2 million households in the USA don't give a damn about television. I lived without one when I was in college. When I went back to school 20 years later, I sold my TV set, and lived happily without one. It's a huge time waster, only appropriate when you have lots of time to waste. When you get busy, TV is worse than worthless.
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On Fri, 12 Jun 2009 06:38:06 -0700, Larry Caldwell

Consider that in modern buildings it (or at least some audio device) is a substitute for the CONSTANT 60Hz (or 50Hz) hum.
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I bought a MIG welder: 115/120 Volt. On reading the manual, it says to plug it into a 20 amp outlet. In my garage, I only have 15A outlets (and one 240V for my Delta Unisaw)
I do have a double circuit, 2-15 amp breakers in the panel to a capped box on the wall in the garage. It was intended for a wall heater which I didn't need, so:
Can I tie the TWO 14 ga wires together at EACH end, to substitute for what would have been a single 12 ga for a 20 amp outlet ? It sounds like a NO-No but in theory, it should work
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wrote: [...]

Not legally, no.

It *is* a no-no. Definitely a violation of the [U.S.] National Electrical Code, probably a violation of the Canadian code as well.
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wrote:

The strancg thing is, if you only used this for the welder you could probably put that 14ga wire on a 20a breaker but it is a problem because of the NEMA 5-15 or 5-20 receptacle.
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I think the concern is that at some point, the one wire or the other may get broken. And then the entire load would be going through the one smaller wire.
The arc welders I've seen have a control to vary the amps flow through the electrode. Using a 15 amp breaker, and 14 ga wire, you may be able to weld at lower amps. I don't know if a mig welder has that kind of control.
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On Jun 13, 2:21pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Not to code and if a fire did result your insurance company would not be pleased! Ensure smoke alarm working in that area; on fresh batteries not AC powered! Also if tying the two black 14 AWG wires together for the hot lead. Then tie the two white 14 AWG wires together for the neutral lead. Because both 'sides' carry current. Also the two ground wires should be common. The size of the breaker as OP is aware is sized to protect the wire size. Not that putting up to 20 amps through a 14 AWG wire will cause it too burn off! Especially for something like a welder that has not only an intermittent use cycle but is often not used at maximum setting? But many of those 115/120 volt welders seem undersized. So we acquired a 230 volt wire welder model and have recently added the inert gas option. So we have wired our garage and those of two of our neighbours with individual 230 volt 30 amp circuits solely for the welder.
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Yes, it s a good quality American made Hobart 140 welder, not a China cheepie. It has all variable settings/controls.
**There is a chart and graph I just found in the manual that says I can set the voltage to the #1 (of 4) setting and it can be used w/15A circuit but I'd still like to find/create a 20 outlet in the garage to be able to use the 3 higher settings as well.

I'd try and get a look at the NEC at the library but since I'm in Canada right now, I doubt if there's one available around here. Its true that the duty cycle is less than 100%, actually, from the graphs, it looks like a "normal" duty cycle is something under 40%, certainly less than 60%.

Well, after reading some of the helpful hints here, I decided to have a look in both the 240V (tablesaw) outlet box and the one intended for ( unused so far) electric heater..No Joy. Both are actually 240V 2 pole wired. There is only a black, white and ground in each box so its a straight 120+120 coming down each leg. The tablesaw is 12 ga and the heater is 14 so no way to make a legit 120V/20A out of those without rewiring the 12 ga.. and that would put an end to my 240V tablesaw circuit.
HMMM (lightbulb "on"): Now I do have a 120V/ 30A RV plug over on the other side of the garage..I wonder whats in there..if I could split off a 20A since I sold my RV and the outlet is never used anyway. I'll have to take a look.
Thanks to all who replied so far.
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wrote:

Put a 20a breaker in the RV circuit and change the receptacle. You are done. Good lightbulb moment ;-)
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On Jun 13, 10:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yup; use the RV socket solely for welding by changing the receptacle to a standard 3 prong plink .....! Suggest use a single not a duplex outlet. That means now and any time in future someone will not be able to plug two things into that dedicated 'welder' outlet at same time! As an example we used a single orange 3 pin North American outlet for our computer from the UPS supply in the basement. Accordingly our printers and scanner cannot be plugged into that and overload it's output. But the computer remains. If wanting to get fancy; could put a special polarized socket there and a special polarized plug on the welder. But that means you then can't easily plug the welder in anywhere else!
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stan wrote:

couldn't you use a duplex 20A recep on a 30A circuit? or is that only allowable for 15A receps/20A circuits?
nate
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Hey, I didn't read your post before I wrote mine. Honest!
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com ( snipped-for-privacy@aol.com) says...

Even simpler, put a 30A RV plug on the end of the welder cord.
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Doing that, he'd have a 20 amp device on a 30 amp breaker. Would that be safe? Yeah, I know. Not too badly out of safeness.
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I have a table lamp with a 14W CF bulb -- at 120V, that's a 0.117 amp device. Would it be safe to plug that into a 15A circuit?
Sheesh. Get a grip.
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 11:52:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You need a DEDICATED 250mA (1/4A) circuit for that lamp :-)
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Depends. What's the wire gage of the appliance?
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Were you born this dense, or did you train?
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It's a public service. I don't make a penny by doing this. After a brief but intense period of training, I went into a lengthy apprenticeship. I am now qualified to go on service calls, and ask stupid questions.
Perhaps I can regale you with some of my finest.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

With a welder, it doesn't matter. They are specifically exempted from this particular code requirement. (section 630, if I recall correctly, but I could be way off)
Bob
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