temp. column while replacing foundation wall

Twenty years ago I replaced a section of my 100yr old stone foundation. At the time my father-in-law, a lifelong construction worker guided me through the process.
One of the first steps was placing steel support columns on a footer that got tied into the footing for the block wall. Then the block was laid, burying the column within the wall. Since that wall has gone 20 yrs without so much as a hairline crack I want to replicate it as I replace 40 more feet of wall. [I also managed to do the job without cracking any plaster upstairs-- something else I'd like to replicate.]
But I can't remember the details of that footing for the steel posts. It will be resting on hard clay. I *think* it was a 2x2' slab 8-12" thick whose surface lay 6" below the surface of the footing. [re-rod extending a foot on each end to tie into footing.] These were placed every 10 feet before power excavation was begun.
If this is a common practice, or anyone has some better ideas, I'm open to suggestions. Father in law has gone on to that great project in the sky.
The footing for the block will be 2' wide & 1' thick, reinforced with 3 1/2" re-rod. 12 courses of block -- house is 2 story frame with balloon construction. It's still good and stiff-- the walls are full 2x4s, the sheathing is T&G 1x10s & full thickness novelty siding is under the old aluminum siding.
Jim
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Jim:
Let me know how you make out with this. I replaced a 16' sections of basement wall a few years ago w/ block and surface bonding cement. I want to do more a slightly different way. My basement is beachsand w/ huge rocks in it. The beach sand concrete is crumbling in areas and I want to form a concrete wall against the solid rocks. Either that or have gunite or shotecrete sprayed on it but no contractors ever get back to me.
Good luck with your project!
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