Telephone Wiring

I completed re-wiring the telephone service for a building in a star (home-run) configuration. There are 5 circuits plus the network line from the outside.
I wired everything using CAT-6 cable from the outside box and all inside wiring. Inside cables are now behind sheetrock.
I was planning on using a hub/junction (66-block or 110 block) in the future, temporarily using a wire nut, but now I'm not sure.
When the phone service was being hooked up today, the technician noted that I used stranded cable everywhere and he had never seen that on the outside line and a junction box would not work unless solid wire was used. My inside plugs were fitted with a punchdown connector which worked fine with the stranded wire.
Did I make a mistake here in using stranded wire? I can still get to my network run, should I replace it with solid core wire for better reliability? Plan on using phone and DSL on the line.
Any input appreciated, Gary.
replies to (firefly 24 @ comcast . net) remove spaces.
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Stranded cables are typically used in either fire alarm or audio applications. Although you will find that alot of data patch cords too are stranded.
Stranded cable is somewhat difficult to punch down both on jacks or blocks but as long as all of your parts are rated at Cat 6 your service should not be affected. Either a 110 or 66 block will work, I would just take a moment to twist the pairs in one direction so they all are punched in the same post.
Cross talk and next failures will result if you have stray wires touching other posts either on the jack side or block side.
Another option on the block side, although a little bit more expensive would be to install Cat 6, RJ45 mod ends on each cable. Your 66 block and/or 110 block would need to be ordered with RJ45 jack type positions built into either the side of the 66 block or under the first row on the 110 block.
Whether you opt to twist your strands or install mod ends, you will want to pair test your connection. If you get a good reading, the odds are that you will probably never have to touch the termination again. Changes to service would/could or should be made with your cross connects.
Whether your cables are used for phone, DSL or extending your network, I don't think I would go the extra expense to change now that walls are closed up. I wouldn't use wirenuts either because the more terminations a cable has the more chances for error.
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Technically for inside wiring runs and the like that one would consider "permanent" one should use solid core wire. However, I have used stranded wire instead of the solid core and have not had a problem.
Mark

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NewsReader wrote:

Stranded cables have a higher attenuation than solid. That's why TIA/EIA 568A limits the length of patch cables to 10 meters in total length.
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Yes. Who told you using stranded was the right wire? Get them to give you a discount on the replacement spool of solid core wire you should've used. But if you guessed this on your own, well take your lumps on the learning experience.

Yes, you should replace it. Wire's cheap, the hassles of untangling all this later when it turns out your network is unreliable will make it seem foolish not to have replaced it. It's possible to use stranded wire for reasonably short distances. But by the time you measure the actual distances (up the wall, across the ceiling, down to the patch panel...) it's probably much longer than the recommended limits on patch cables.
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Yes you did. However, since the total amount of wire involved is relatively small and if you take adequate care, you probably won't have problems with it.
I discovered this myself when wiring a few phone circuits I wanted to do punch down connections. They're tricky, and over time the fine strands may oxidize and disintegrate because of the mechanical abuse they got.
[A friend, a professional networking specialist has a gallery of pictures of "horrible wiring", including punch down blocks wired with all sorts of nonsense, including people trying to make stranded work in punch blocks by _soldering_ it!]
In my case, feeling suitably embarrassed, I soldered solid pigtails to the ends of the three stranded phone lines... I won't make that mistake again.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Where can you buy junction blocks for phone wires? I have to tie in all my phone wires from my basement renovation.
Mike

relatively
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punch
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Radio Shack.
: > > Did I make a mistake here in using stranded wire? : > : > Yes you did. However, since the total amount of wire involved is : relatively : > small and if you take adequate care, you probably won't have problems with : it. : > : > I discovered this myself when wiring a few phone circuits I wanted to do : punch : > down connections. They're tricky, and over time the fine strands may : > oxidize and disintegrate because of the mechanical abuse they got. : > : > [A friend, a professional networking specialist has a gallery of : > pictures of "horrible wiring", including punch down blocks wired : > with all sorts of nonsense, including people trying to make stranded : > work in punch blocks by _soldering_ it!] : > : > In my case, feeling suitably embarrassed, I soldered solid pigtails : > to the ends of the three stranded phone lines... I won't make that : > mistake again. : > -- : > Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est : > It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them. : :
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Forget radio shack unless you want a piece of junk. Do it RIGHT(tm).
Go to Graybar if you have one locally or on the web and get a "66 block" and a punchdown tool for it.
http://www.graybar.com/ and search for "66 block"
It will have (usually) 50 rows of 6 terminals each. Each of the 6 are jumped together. Take 2 rows and punch down the input pair on one side, then 5 more pairs across. If you need more than 5 pairs, jump to the next pair and use them. There are other sizes, the 50x6 is one of the most common sizes.
Google for "66 block" will show lots of good pictures. You can also get plastic covers for the blocks.
You gan also get "110 blocks" which are smaller but harder to work with.
--
Rich Greenberg Marietta, GA, USA richgr atsign panix.com + 1 770 321 6507
Eastern time. N6LRT I speak for myself & my dogs only. VM\'er since CP-67
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Rich Greenberg wrote:

I have always preferred the 66M blocks which are 2 & 2 by 50. The left and right sides of each row can be joined to each other by bridging clips. The incoming lines are connected and jumpered down the left side and the wiring to the stations in the home is connected to the right side. Removal of the bridging clips will isolate any stations jack wiring for testing or repair.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes and yet we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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Home Depot has both 66-block and 110-block. Both were under $20.

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