Teen electrocuted changing bulb at gas station

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Aren't those illegal in Kalifornia?
Steve
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Some of those attendants at the convenience stores have long arms. Wouldn't one have to touch both ends at the same time to be electrocuted?
Steve
Sorry, someone had to say it.
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no,you just have to touch the HOT side and be touching some other ground point. resting one arm on an aluminum ladder sited on the ground could be enough.
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Jim Yanik
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Poor guy. First he gets zapped. Then he falls no one knows how far and hits who knows what. Then his only aide and rescuer has a heart attack. I wonder what was going through that poor guy's mind.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

Besides him possibly being grounded, if the voltage and frequency is high enough, you don't even need a ground path. Imagine a little static shock you often get in the winter, then think of that same little zap hitting you 120 times per second, or if it's from an electronic ballast the frequency goes up to 20,000 Hz (40,000 times per second) or higher.
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A sixteen-foot-long bulb?
Is there such a thing? Longest I've ever seen is 8ft.
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Tegger

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Tegger wrote:

I've installed some ten foot HO sign lamps before. It's not something you will find at Lowe's-Depot.
TDD
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wrote:

I know they make some long ones, BAck in the 60s my dad ran a filling station. The office ceiling was 10ft and I remember that you couldnt stand the bulbs up inside the office.
Jimmie
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JIMMIE wrote:

At one time, service stations commonly used long florescent HO lighting fixtures mounted on poles at an angle to light the lots. The fixtures went away when HID lighting became more common. Are those the lights you're referring to?
TDD
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Metspitzer wrote:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/04/19/BA241D10M5.DTL&tsp=1
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/04/19/BA241D10M5.DTL&tsp=1#ixzz0lfEcei5j I wonder what voltage is needed to light a 16 footer? Then to make things worse, if it's a solid state ballast it's at a high frequency too. Then a fall to the ground also. Ouch. Poor kid.
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What happens usually happens after the zap. Many witnesses do not know CPR, and therefore it is not administered until the heart can take over. AC shocks interrupt the electrical rhythm of the heart, and until that gets back into synch, the person does not get proper blood flow. There are only a couple of minutes to initiate CPR, and brain damage begins.
The witness, in this case, also had a medical emergency, so I would assume that he did very little to assist the victim. Also not stated was whether there was other trauma from the fall. Whacking your head on the floor from that height is enough to kill you, too, or in combination. Then, if there are any other cardiac irregularities, either known or undiagnosed, the high frequency AC shock could have triggered a cardioelectric event such as fibrillation or arrhythmia.
He could not have been in contact with the electricity for that long, as he would have fallen and lost contact.
Just a sad story.
Steve
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Tony wrote the following:

The report says he was electrocuted while changing a bulb. It does not say that it was the actual changing of the bulb that electrocuted him.
"But something went wrong as the San Francisco resident climbed on top of a *metal enclosure* that holds propane tanks on the outside of the 76 gas station at 101 S. Mayfair Ave., police said. Somehow, as Algazawy changed the florescent light bulbs on the outside of the station, *he came into contact with a 120-volt power source* and was electrocuted, San Mateo County Coroner Robert Foucrault said". http://www.mercurynews.com/breaking-news/ci_14917381
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Bill
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willshak wrote:

Based on that description I would think that it was normal 8' flouro lamps, the reflector / cover was missing and probably a wire nut had fallen off exposing the twisted and still connected power lead which he bumped while maneuvering the 8' tube. Falling from standing on the 6' high or so LP tank cage probably sent him head first into concrete as well.
Certainly a better report than the original one. Either way sucky for the kid and the manager.
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