Tear out or just pave over asphalt driveway?

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On 04/27/2010 09:43 AM, TimR wrote:

I'm not real serious at this point, but if you can dig it up without too much trouble I'd appreciate it, just out of curiosity (and maybe they have a web site I could browse to get a ballpark idea of what it'd cost)
nate
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replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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Pavers are the most widely used form of permeable driveway material.
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On Apr 28, 10:23 am, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Right, but if I can't use a floor jack, jackstands, creeper, etc. on it, it's useless to me.
nate
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Higgs Boson wrote:

Driveway runoff is insignificant. It just runs over to the lawn. Even lawns have runoff with moderate to heavy rains. The whole idea is a stupid one.
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LSMFT

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Hmm, with a sig like that ...
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

What's the difference between half an inch of rain where it runs off the 8 foot driveway onto the lawn or a whole inch of rain on a dirt driveway and lawn? Nothing. What's a brook for? Runoff. What's a rive for? Runoff.
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LSMFT

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I can see that.
Try to imagine a tree starved for water that has run off into some faraway river. Then try to imagine a storm pushing that tree on your home.
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Han
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Absolutely not true.
Even lawns have runoff with moderate to heavy rains.
Also not true.
The whole idea is a stupid one.
Er...Honi soit qui mal y pense.
(I actually know what LSMFT meant, way back when)

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The grass along the edges of my asphalt driveway are the only areas that remain green during the dry season.
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2010 19:35:34 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

When streets are "re-asphalted" a machine smooths, removes part, and roughens up the old asphalt. If the equipment is available this may be the way to go, otherwise remove the old and establish a smooth base. Better yet, put in a concrete driveway.
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This is done a lot. Many times the defects can reflect thru the new asphalt. Much depends on the condition of the existing drive. Sometimes fabric can be put down to help. I think putting a thick layer down such as 4 inches would help as well. Local conditions also apply. What are the contractors suggesting?
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wrote:

To get back to my original question, assume no concrete, no permeable stone/pavers. If the base is checkered, but still very firm, would 3 inches of new asphalt be as good as tearing the old out and repaving with 2 inches of asphalt?
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wrote:

Asphalt over concrete WILL crack at the concrete joints
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Please read the OP. The existing driveway is asphalt.
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These driveways do NOT NOT NOT facilitate drainage of rainwater into the lawn -- if any -- quite the contrary. Water goes straight into the storm drains, carrying with it the **** described in earlier messages.
What kind of *** do you have in your driveway? I have some weeds and some dirt, maybe a bit of pollen.
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It's not the **** in my driveway, or anybody else's driveway, that should be a community concern. Let me try again:
When water runs off a driveway into the gutter, it makes its way to the sea or another body of water, taking along with it all the **** that people and animals have dumped in the gutter.
Since in most (all?) communities, storm water is not treated, the **** ends up where we definitely do NOT want it to be -- like where our children swim.
So, until everybody gets decent and does NOT dump **** in gutters or let their dogs do on the parkway and shove it in the gutter, (don't hold your breath), at least let's not add to the swift current of rainwater carrying **** with it.
In the process, we also help our mini-environment by allowing rainwater to permeate the soil rather than run off.
As mentioned earlier, some large companies have gotten the message and -- in the process of creating "green" headquarters* -- they build huge underwater tanks to save rainwater for landscaping, thus saving money since they don't have to buy so much H2O.
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wrote:

What kind of driveways don't do this? You don't quote anything and then you use an adjective like "these"!

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Fair enough.
First, I am coming off statement by somebody back in this thread asserting that driveways facilitate drainage of rainwater. I was quite startled by that statement.
Now: My (old and narrow) driveway has two concrete strips with dirt in between. The strips (approx 10 feet) rise quite sharply from the sidewalk as they approach the gate, where they level off and run another 25 feet or so to the back patio.
Inside the gate, there is grass between the strips, but outside, I can't get anything to grow because car always shades it. So now bare dirt, bordered by lawn on R. side and concrete curb on L. side.

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On Sun, 25 Apr 2010 13:39:50 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

He doesn't have concrete. He has asphalt.
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If your replacing with all new asphalt a NEW properly comacted base is critical.
Otherwise its just a waste of money:(
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