Tankless vs Tank water heater. Whats will last longer? I already have a high powered solar water heater.

Page 2 of 2  

wrote:

I have a propane tank, but am not going to use propane to heat and maintain 80 gallons of water. We bought one over a year ago (114 gal.), and it still has like 85%. The tank is an odd size, because the regs say anything over 115 gals. (or whatever it is) must be located XX feet from the house. We needed it as we got a big propane gas top Bosch. I sure like that cooktop.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The roof is yet to be finished, mainly because of sunlight and heat, it being 110 here yesterday. Yes, ideally, a solar collector would work just fine, and I could put it on top of the water drip cooling system I'm putting on the roof. But for the money, I'd rather spend a couple of months in Kauai.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 24 Aug 2011 15:52:45 -0700, chaniarts

Until something goes wrong with the propane truck - - - -
And in many areas, propane and electricity are a "toss-up"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/25/2011 9:53 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

i believe i could wait until the truck was fixed. i only need a refill once/year (its a big tank, and i have low usage), and there are at least 6 companies that deliver to my area. i usually call each of them to get the lowest price (why can't they just post the daily cost somewhere and save everyone some time?) because there's usually at least a $1.50/gallon spread between highest to lowest.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Natural gas, yes. Bottle (propane or butane) gas, not necessarily. When I was paying .10/kwh, the breakeven was around $2/gallon. Less than that (typical in the summer), it was cheaper to use propane. Winter was cheaper to use electricity as propane jumped up around 2.40/gal.. However, since then, eletricity has increased well over 20%, so the breakeven point has gone up.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, yes, no, absolutely, maybe, and I don't know.
We live in rural Utah. No natural gas lines within miles. We do have a propane tank for our stove, and an electric oven. We have two 40 gallon electric water heaters.
Heating water with propane would be prohibitive cost wise.
At the cabin, we have a gas hot water heater, bought in 1986, and still going, as we use it about three months a year, and drain it the rest of the time.
Sometimes, it is not just as easy as you make it sound. The cabin was total propane for the first six years, with propane lights, stove, hot water heater and refrigerator. Then we brought in electricity @ $22,000 split 7 ways. I don't know if I could have natural gas brought in to this property if I wanted it, and I'm sure I would have to live about 700 years to amortize the cost.
One size does not fit all, just like your advice.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Water-Heaters-Tankless/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqjiZ1z109sr/R-202176600/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Water-Heaters-Residential/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqowZ1z109srZ1z11t6dZ1z11uzjZ1z11l1u/R-100659227/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
The longer warranty should give you a clue as to what the manufacturer believes the longevity to be. I'd always go with a tank because it gives you 50G of water for emergency use. I also prefer my pilot lighted gas tank heater because on occasion, when the power fails in the winter, I've used it to fill 5 gallon jugs of hot water to keep the bedroom warm when it was 8 degrees F outside. Now, I'd probably snake a garden hose through the bedroom based on what others here have done, but I love my tank heater.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does anyone have any knowledge about what is better, Tankless or Tank

plus a tankless in a area where incoming water temp gets low in winter can cause cool showers in winter when a hot shower is the most valuable.......
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob haller, Robert Green and rishi khanna wrote

tank
it
plus a tankless in a area where incoming water temp gets low in winter can cause cool showers in winter when a hot shower is the most valuable.......
======================================================While I suspect tankless heaters are becoming simpler and more reliable and tank heaters are becoming more complex (efficiency add-ons), my bet is still on the tank, if only for the 50 gallons of "spare water" available. We've been able to bump the setting on our tank heater to maximum during real cold spells, but it's a little dangerous because the hot comes out hot enough to scald. Still, the hotter it is, the longer the supply lasts for things like showers where you're tempering it with cold water anyway. My wife likes to wash our bed linens and towels in near boiling water ever since some friends of mine from my hippy days visited last year and appeared to have picked up bedbugs and brought them to us. Fortunately we caught the little bastards in time. So we're OK with the bumped to maximum heat setting. We try to remember to turn it down for guests. I was surprised that the monthly gas bill didn't seem to increase much at all.
Still I am sure that tankless heaters have their uses. I just don't seem to have any. I might consider it if I still did my own color printing but a tank is good enough and usually runs until it's dead and you just get a new one every 20 years or so. I remember working in a photofinishing plant where they had two long rows of tank heaters running 24 x 7 installed because Kodak had just introduced high temperature color developing chemicals that cut process time enormously. Enough to justify adding 20 new heaters and their corresponding gas bills.
From the little I've seen of tankless heaters, they are a much more complicated device and in my mind, that's not a good thing with gas appliances. I've seen gas explosions knock down buildings so I kind of like the long, long safety record of tank heaters. They've really studied the causes of water heater-caused fires and tried to eliminate them with a number of safety features.
Tankless spooks me just because the volume of gas fed to them is usually higher than to a tank heater. The larger the pipe, the more gas can leak per second. Maybe in another 10 or 20 years. I think they're inherently more efficient, but that at their current cost and frequency of repair, that efficiency is lost. I expect that will change as the designs "harden" and the best materials are found for the job. IIRC, fellow furnace makers still haven't gotten it right concerning heat exchanger material selection, at least based on some of the burn-throughs I've seen.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Green wrote:

I would like to see a study where they measure the amount of gas used by a conventional tank WH just sitting in a typical residential basement for a month or 2 or 3 with no water used. Just sitting there on standby. Any gas used during that time can obviously be attributed to the overhead cost of that style of design that a tankless WH wouldn't have.
And then give that number in terms of $ per month or per year based on average national NG price.
As for efficiency at heating incoming water, are tankless WH's high efficiency? As in multi-stage heat exchangers? As in condensing (ie - their exhaust gas stream is cold enough to duct out of the house with a plastic pipe) ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why are you asking him? You were making claims here that tankless were very inefficient compared to tank type.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net" wrote:

I'm asking anyone who can answer that particular question, which apparently isin't you.

I said cost-ineffective. As in negligable cost-of-operation savings when compared to a egular heater, but with a much higher up-front purchase and installation cost, combined with higher service costs and higher rate of malfunction.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, you said they were inefficient period. You seem to have an inability to remember what you've posted. Here, let me help you out:
"In other words, perhaps 50% of the combustion heat of an on-demand heater is actually being transfered to the incoming cold water and the other 50% is being lost in the exhaust, while 80% of the combustion heat is absorbed by the water in a conventional tank. The difference is that an on-demand heater is on perhaps 30 to 90 minutes per day, while a conventional tank might be on for 4 hours a day. But remember that when a conventional tank is on, it's burners are using a much smaller amount of gas compared to the on-demand heater. "
Got that now? That is NOT saying that tankless is ineffective. It is saying that they are flat out energy inefficient. And of course it's wrong. And it's also why I asked why you are now asking someone else about efficiency when you're here telling us you already know that tankless are inefficient.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But that's a fairly unrealistic test that doesn't mirror the usage pattern of very many homeowners. So what if it's cheaper to operate if you're not operating it? The point of owning a water heater is to heat water. I discovered when boosting the temperature setting of my tank heater that the average bill did not increase very much. In the real world, one service call for a tankless heater out of warranty can neutralize any savings attained by buying it. Tankless heaters are relatively new and my experience has been that relatively new technologies have bugs that still need to be worked out.

Don't forget that tankless heaters cost more, often require an expensive supply pipe upgrade and usually come with a much shorter warranty (that usually indicates the manufacturer's own belief - or lack of - in their product's longevity). Start stacking those costs against the fuel cost and the equation tilts in favor of tank heaters, at least from what I've seen.
-- Bobby G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

water use may go up espically if you have teenagers who may camp out in the shower, some cell phones are now waterproof.........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/24/2011 12:04 AM, rishi khanna wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Water-Heaters-Tankless/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqjiZ1z109sr/R-202176600/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
http://www.homedepot.com/Plumbing-Water-Heaters-Residential/h_d1/N-5yc1vZbqowZ1z109srZ1z11t6dZ1z11uzjZ1z11l1u/R-100659227/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
We have a 5000 watt tank-less water heater under our sink. It gets the water warm at best. I couldn't recommend a tank-less heater based on the performance of ours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is POU, and there is tankless. A 5 gallon tank POU heater can be very effective - if you never need more than 5 gallons of very hot water every half hour or so.
A tankless POU may be totally useless in the same situation.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My nephew was making a similar choice 3 or 4 years ago he went with tanked then realized what he really needed was a larger hot water storage tank for his solar heater. The new water heater sufficed. Except in the coldest part of the winter it stays turned OFF. Im not sure he really needs it then.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.