T-stat for heater

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It's getting cold here at night (30-50F-and my apologies to those for whom these temps are a mild spring day) and I'd like to rig up a heater for an enclosure my sister has for her outside cats.
I have a small electric heater (ceramic, fan) and I'd like to get a t-stat setup that would allow the heater to come on when the enclosure gets cold, then shut off if it gets too warm. At the same time I'd like to have this setup on a timer that would keep it off during the day, say from 10am to 6 pm)
Any suggestions??
Charles
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Check out by googling beer brewing supplies. They have temperature controls that might work for that.
Steve
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On 1/4/2011 12:46 PM, Charles Bishop wrote:

A line voltage thermostat in series with a time switch. Timer first. Here are links to some that do both jobs:
http://www.honeywell-thermostat.com/honeywell/TL8230A1003-thermostat.html
http://tinyurl.com/g2taf
http://www.acehardware.com/product/index.jsp?productId 73065
http://tinyurl.com/34b7kg2
TDD
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On Jan 4, 12:46 pm, snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (Charles Bishop) wrote:

Electric heaters usualy have settings that consume 6-900 and 1500 watts, 1500 watts might cost me near $100 to run a month. Consider a small heating pad a pharmacy has, they might take 30-60 watts. The cats can sleep on it and stay plenty warm since the heat will rise around them. Put a piece of foam rubber under the pad so you dont loose the heat.
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ransley wrote:

What? 100.00 a month? Our power costs 7 cents/KWh.
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?

Possible. The rate here is 18¢. At 1500 watts, that is 27¢ an hour. If you ran the heater on high for 12 hours a day, the cost would be about $100 a month.
My guess, though, is that the enclosure can be heated with far less wattage and less hours per day. In any case, the heating pad idea is probably a better one.
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But WHO is at .07 a KWH, answer, nobody in the USA.
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On Wed, 05 Jan 2011 15:41:51 -0800, ransley wrote:

Ours here in northern MN is about 8.5c/kWH for regular supply and 4.5c/ kWH for the load-controlled devices (which our 14kW of electric baseboard heat is hooked up to)
cheers
Jules
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On Thu, 6 Jan 2011 01:20:18 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

you only use a little makes the price per kwh significantly higher - and if you use a lot, the rate goes up.
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On Wed, 05 Jan 2011 22:55:42 -0500, clare wrote:

I just checked: for our "non-load-controlled" service we get the first 500kWH per month at 8.8c/kWH and anything over that at 7.8c/kWH. The load- controlled service (i.e. all the baseboards, dryer and water heater) are at 4.7c/kWH regardless of how much (or little) we use.
The service fee seems to be a flat $25 per month, then state taxes of $6 and some 'renewable energy' fee that's linked to how much we use (about $15 for November)
"non-load-controlled" service worked out as 691kWH for November, and the load-controlled service at 2025kWH.
cheers
Jules
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On Thu, 6 Jan 2011 01:20:18 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

I'll bet no one sells *discount* electricity to keep cats warm *outdoors*.
I think the whole thing is a waste of money and natural resources, but I'm posting just to say that humans should not sleep on a heating pad. My mother's came with a warning not to do that, and indeed once she rolled over in her sleep, ended up on top of it, and got burned. It took quite a while to heal and I guess could have been much worse if she had slept that way longer.

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mm wrote:

Jumping on here, no longer have previous posts. I saw this item and thought of this thread.
It's a thermostatically controlled "outlet". Might work, might not?
The Thermo Cube is a unique, patented electrical device that plugs into a standard 15 amp electrical outlet and turns power on automatically according to outside air temperature, saving money by using power only when... Read more http://preview.tinyurl.com/2em7nfc
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On 1/7/2011 8:55 AM, leonard hofstadter wrote:

I think the OP wanted to put a timer on it too.
TDD
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On Fri, 07 Jan 2011 08:55:38 -0600, leonard hofstadter wrote:

Strange. I don't see any mention of an included temperature probe - if it's used indoors, how does it know what the outside air temperature is? :-)
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Jules Richardson wrote:

Hence, the part of my post you stripped: Might work, might not?
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On Fri, 07 Jan 2011 22:36:00 -0600, leonard hofstadter wrote:

Well, it was just a comment that they claim it monitors *outdoor* temperature; I suspect that it does no such thing, and just monitors the temperature immediately surrounding the device itself. The manufacturers themselves claim that it monitors outside air temp though, so it's not Amazon's screw-up if that's not actually true.
cheers
Jules
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wrote:

Idaho is $.08/kWh.
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wrote:

08, im sure thats before all the taxes and surcharges. divide kwh used by the total cost
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wrote:

It's also a state average; some areas will likely be higher, some lower.
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wrote:

BTW, I looked at my bill today. $.08/kWh for 1800kWh, + $5 tax.
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