T-111 siding question

I've got the typical tract house out here in Central TX. Built in the '80s with T-111 siding. The bottom on T-111 tends to rot where it contacts the bottom moisture. I bought the house 6 years ago with some pretty bad spots so I cut the offending T-111 off and replaced it. The rest looks fine. I wonder how many people replace all the siding when only about 6" is actually bad?
That's not the question. I want to re-do the siding on at least one side of my house to make it better sound and weather insulated.
The question is: What about weather resistant sheet insulation and new T-111 siding and going over the existing siding (assuming I weather sealed it of course) and putting on new trim?
Anyone ever done this? Why take the old siding/insulation out/ Why not just add to what is there and just putting on another layer?
Jim
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Probably not a good idea, you might wind up with multiple vapor barriers.
Plus how would you accommodate the added wall thickness at the windows, doors, roof & corners of the house?
methinks it is not typically done this way because the results are not great. :(
cheers Bob
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On 12/19/2010 12:51 PM, DD_BobK wrote:

I think your vapor barrier response is a good point and probably why I won't do it. :)
Aesthetically there wouldn't be a problem. The eave of the roof box completely covers the top of the trim sufficiently to cover the top of the siding
Jim
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Follow up.
A neighbor of mine is some type of building contractor. I'll ask him. He did a stucco covering on his siding. I'll ask how he prepared his siding for the stucco?
Anyone done this sort of thing? Stucco for T-111? (or over T-111?)
Jim
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Jim T wrote:

1. Nail on metal lath (looks like honey comb)
2. Apply stucco
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dadiOH
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Sounds easy :-)
I'd be worried about the stucco leatching mostiure into the T-111. Use some sort of moisture barrier? Paint? Remove T-111 and replace with hardie board? (That doesn't sound easy or cheap)
Jim
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people around here add a layer of hard foam insulation, then cover with vinyl siding, but must re frame around windows, often they replace these windows at the same time..
heat bills down appearance much improved
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On 12/19/2010 2:00 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I just had argon gas windows installed. http://www.dycwindows.com/windows/single_hung.asp The difference is like night and day. If anyone thinks they need this done, they do :-).
Replacing trim isn't a problem. The siding on my house is butt simple and under a roof box eave so it only gets moisture towards the bottom. It's a one story house. The siding stays dry but the foundation leaches into the t-111. A good water barrier would have to be installed on the bottom 8" or so. A piece of primed hardie plank would work.
Jim.
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Here's a pic of my shop remodel.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/4733385477 /
Cut the T111 at a 30 angle and apply a 1-1/2" drip edge along the new seam. Once you cut the rotten parts off, apply a metal barrier (onto the studs) that extend a bit below where the new T111 will be placed. The bottom edge of the replacement T111 should be beveled also, so that moisture doesn't wick back toward the framing. Prime with oil base primer, not water based, and prime the back side of the replacement T111, at least 6" to 10" up (roller width = 9"). Prime and paint the beveled edges, too, before installation. Screw the replacement T111 in place..... it will be easier to remove, if it ever needs to be removed.
My home garage has T111, installed as on the shop. It has remained in good shape for 20 yrs.
Sonny
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Jim T wrote:

Right.
1. Nail on metal lath (looks like honey comb) *AFTER* shingling up with building (tar) paper.
2. Apply stucco
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dadiOH
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Probably lots, but I woudlnt' do it. For me, cutting off 6" would be an excuse to buy new tools.

I hate stucco. (not the stucco company that echos this ng, but stucco in general.) But that's personal taste. I have no objection to it otherwise.
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