swapping an oven plug for a clothes dryer plug

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I want to move a clothes dryer to the room that once had a oven/stove. I notice that while both units use 240V the plugs are different - one cannot just plug the dryer into the socket once used by the oven.
first, can anyone tell me why the sockets and plugs are different if both applicances use 240V. and second, can I simply replace the oven power socket with a new dryer-shaped one and carry on - or is there something else that needs changing (like the breaker??) as well.
I think I read somewhere that ovens and dryers have require difference amperage.
many thanks
Peter
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Nope. You can't, usually.

Yip.
A range that's plug-and-cord connected will usually (in the US) have wiring that allows for 50A and a 50A recepticle. Our range specifically recommends protection with 40A slo-blo, so that's what I installed when we bought the range.
A dryer has 30A wiring and almost always a 30A fuse or breaker.
Assuming you can find a recepticle and breaker that fits your panel and has sufficiently large clamps for the existing wire run, you need only switch the recepticle and breaker. The dryer will Love the larger wire.
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wrote:

While it should be possible to buy a cordset for a range and attach it to the dryer, the problem is that your 30A dryer is now connected to a 50A fused branch circuit. Significantly more damage can occur to your dryer if a situation requiring the breaker to trip occurs. You will increase the possibility for fire or electrocution somewhat.
A proper solution would be to leave the 30A cordset on the dryer and replace both the receptacle and circuit breaker at the panel with a 30A parts. Depending on the breaker panel, this might not be very difficult as the breakers should be the same size and pop one out and pop the other in. An experienced DIYer can get through it in an hour with $50-$60 in parts. The old 50A wire is plenty sufficient for 30A service and need not be replaced.
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You don't say for sure, but it is possible that the dryer is on a 30A circuit but wired with a 50A plug.
It cost additional dollars for the higher capacity wire and a 50 A breaker. Most electricians would not logically incure the extra expense to wire a dryer with a non-code, higher capacity circuit unless they had some really compelling reason to do so.
Such was the case when I moved into my house (built around 1990-91). The dryer circuit was properly wired with a 30 amp dual breaker set and #10 wire. The dryer outlet however, was wired with a 50 Amp Range Socket.
Apparently, the electricians in this part of the Pacific Northwest thought they could save money by stocking just one type of 240V plug (the 50A range socket) and 50A cordsets during that period of time. The problem was apparently so widespread that Sears made an official issue of it and would not allow their dryer installers to finish an installation until the outlet had been replaced by a qualified electrician.
I was surprised when I bought my dryer at Sears and the salesperson brought up the issue. Sure enough, I had one of those 50A sockets in the laundry room. It was easy enough to change out though and thus I did not have any problems with the installers.
Another issue these days is the 4 wire vs. 3 wire plug and cordset. I believe the requirement is all new installations need to be 4 wire (Ground, Neutral, hot, and hot). In older work, the older 3 wire installations were all grandfathered to be OK (where the neutral served as a ground). This applies to dryers and ranges so make sure you get the cordset right.
Beachcomber
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excellent information gentlemen. thank you. one final question - I would like to place this dryer further from the plug receptacle than the current dryer cord set allows. is there some reason that the length of a cord set is limited (it appears) to about 6 feet? can/should a competent electrician be able to install a longer dryer cord which would allow me to position the dryer say 10 feet from the receptacle?
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As others have said, just replace the 50A receptacle (outlet) with a 30A type. Cost is about $10. Then go to the panel and change the 50A breaker to a 30A. Cost $12 to $30 depending on breaker type. None of that should be too costly or difficult, just be sure the power is off when you do it. The wire is oversized, but thats OK. (You can not go the other way like change a dryer to a range, because the wire is too small).
As for your question about a longer cord. I think they do make them in 10 or 12 foot lengths, but are probably hard to find. Six foot is the norm. If you only need 10 feet, try to find a longer cord at an electrical supply house. They do sell extension cords too, but I will not recommend them for a 220 device. Since you are replacing the outlet, is there any slack in the wire to move it a few feet? Drilling a new hole in the floor is not all that hard. Of course, you could just repalce the wire too if it's not all that long. You might even leave the range outlet entirely and just run some 10-3 + ground cable to your desired location, install the outlet, and add a 30A breaker in the main panel. That way the range outlet is still there for future needs and you dont have to change anything. If by chance your panel dont have the space for another double breaker, just remove the Range one, cap the wires and use the space for your dryer. It's easy to swap breakers if needed in the future.
Mark
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/swapping-an-oven-plug-for-a-clothes-dryer-plug-42406-.htm hmecmba wrote: Hi there, I know this is an old post, but I have the same concern or need and by reading this I guess I could do the following in my case.
I want to plug my dryer (NEMA 14-30P) on the stove receptor (NEMA 14-50R) so I will.
1.- Replace the dryers cord with a (NEMA 14-50P) 2.- When ever I need to use the dryer I would remove the fuse box. Remove the 2 40amp (one time) 250v or less fuses that are use for the Oven/Ranger. 3.- Plug in my dryer. 4.- Insert 2 30amp 250v fuses.
And when I want to cook, I would repeat the steps but with the correct fuse for the oven.
UNLESS...
The dryer can take the 40amp fuses the current fuse box has for the stove.
Regards, Hernan
pstock wrote:

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http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/swapping-an-oven-plug-for-a-clothes-dryer-plug-42406-.htm
Electrical plug and outlet configurations are designed to assure that the correct voltage, phase, and amperage is providede for the plugged in appliance. In your situation the range line is of a higher amperage than needed for a dryer. You can replace the fuses or circuit breaker with a 30 amp, and replace the 50 amp receptacle with a 30 amp dryer receptacle
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If he still wants both, a somewhat legal way is to tap the #8 going to the stove plug, install a fused/breaker disconnect with a 30 in it and put the dryer receptacle behind that.
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I'm a little confused, but I think he's just referencing another post. I think he only wants the dryer
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RBM wrote: ...

...
NO!
The fusing is for the protection of the _wiring_, _NOT_ the appliance. The appliance is fused internally.
There's nothing inherently different here than plugging in a lamp w/ a 100W light bulb drawing nominally 1A or less into a 20A circuit.
The wiring in question is adequate for the 40A fuses; the dryer will not draw any more current w/ them in place than it would otherwise.
--
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I'll repeat myself: "Electrical plug and outlet configurations are designed to assure that the

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RBM wrote: ...

Actually, on consideration, I'll agree you're posting doesn't say quite what I read it as. And, the plug/cordset need to be rated 50A which the cord for the dryer almost surely isn't.
It'll work; it isn't really the correct solution.
I'd likely bite the bullet and run a dryer circuit meself...
--
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On 10/6/2010 12:37 PM, hmecmba wrote:

http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/swapping-an-oven-plug-for-a-clothes-dryer-plug-42406-.htm
the fuse(s) or breaker is to protect the wiring. Has nothing to do with what you plug into it.
--
Steve Barker
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On Wed, 06 Oct 2010 20:32:42 -0500, Steve Barker

That is not really true. Every appliance is listed based on the branch circuit it is plugged into. The dryer may have some 14 gauge wiring in it that was tested to be safe on a 30a breaker but when you put it on a 40 or 50 you have exceeded the available fault current and voided the listing. I have never seen a fuse in a dryer.
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On 10/7/2010 12:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

given this line of thinking, we could never plug a lamp with an 18ga cord into a 20a outlet. I stand as stated.
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Steve Barker wrote:

Given your line of thinking, we could never plug a lamp with an 18ga cord into a 15A outlet. The cord is rated somewhere around 10A.
UL lists the lamp, which has a plug that fits into both a 15 and 20A outlet. The NEC also allows #18 fixture wires on a 20A circuit.
The dryer manufacturer will specify the branch circuit rating to be used. It is the circuit rating that was used by UL to test the dryer, or is in the UL standard. The branch circuit protection does provide protection for the internal dryer circuit. It is a code and safety violation to use a higher rated branch circuit. I agree with gfretwell. And with RBM.
Swapping fuses to switch between dryer and stove is not very reliable. The dryer is likely to wind up with 40A fuses. You also shouldn't have a 50A receptacle on a 30A branch circuit (406.3-A)
There have been 2 sensible fixes, one by RBM and one by gfretwell.
--
bud--

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On Thu, 07 Oct 2010 07:44:46 -0500, Steve Barker

Lamps are listed to be connected to a 20a circuit, if you plugged it into a 30 you voided the listing.
The answer is in 240.5(B)(2) (2) Fixture Wire. Fixture wire shall be permitted to be tapped to the branch-circuit conductor of a branch circuit in accordance with the following: (1)     20-ampere circuits 18 AWG, up to 15 m (50 ft) of run length (2)     20-ampere circuits 16 AWG, up to 30 m (100 ft) of run length (3)     20-ampere circuits 14 AWG and larger (4)     30-ampere circuits 14 AWG and larger
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On Oct 7, 2:14pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The circuit breaker is directly related to wire size. Just re wire the plug. Carry on as normal.
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