Swage stops (aka buttons)

To connect the two ends of a loop of wire, I bought a package containing an aluminum swage (aka ferrule) and a stop.
How is the stop used?
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wrote:

Isn't the stop used to keep the end of the cable from unraveling? IOW, it just gets placed and crimped near the end of the cable, if there is any significant length sticking out of the swage. IOW, the stop shouldn't be needed if it's swaged near the ends.
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What's that? I've never heard of such. . Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org . .
To connect the two ends of a loop of wire, I bought a package containing an aluminum swage (aka ferrule) and a stop.
How is the stop used?
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See picture here:
https://img2.activant-inet.com/coop/truserv/thumb/t674598.jpg
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Photo:
https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTWAhPy7-OIkadHAXFvKJVXO9ULdor1mmwB1Bwmxwvay6l11zh7
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Gary,
Your terminology is puzzling. If you wish to make a permanent loop in a cable pass the cable end through the ferrule, make your loop, and pass the cable end through the other hole on the ferrule, Now crimp the ferrule with a crimper or compress it with some hammer blows. It's a good idea to keep the cable end slightly inside the ferrule hole so that stray wires don't scratch. There is no need for a stop when making a loop. An eyelet is sometimes a good idea with a cable loop. To use a stop pass it through the cable end, run it up the cable to where you wish to stop the cable, and crimp or hammer the stop. Ok, now tell us what you are doing.
Dave M.
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I need to run one end of the cable through two eyebolts (about 2 feet apart), remove any slackness, then connect the two ends of the cable.
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Gary,
That's a big loop, so I doubt an eyelet would be needed. Is this the "earthquake" project? If so, no worries about neat ends. Pass the cable through the eyebolts. Pass one end through the ferrule in one direction and the other end through in the other direction. Now pull tight while your assistant uses the crimpers. Cable may be overkill, I'd use cheap rope.
Dave M.
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Yes, this is the "earthquake" project.
One eyebolt is screwed into the wall stud and the other eyebolt is screwed into the top of the cabinet. There's only about 6 inches of space between the top of the cabinet and the ceiling so there's really not enough room fo r me to pull tight on the cable while my assistant crimps the cable in the ferrule. Is there another alternative to using ferrules?
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Gary,
I'd use rope. Make a loop as planned and join the ends in a square knot. Pull to remove slack but not taut. Even cheap rope, when doubled in a loop should give you about 500 lbs. of load strength
Dave M.
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Here's what I ended up doing:
I screwed an eyebolt into three studs in the wall then I screwed three eyebolts into fthe wooden blocks that were screwed onto the top of the cabinet I then ran an 8-foot-long cable through each eyebolt Finally, I used a turnbuckle to cinch the looped ends of the cable (held by wire rope clips) snug. Now, when the "Big One" hits, the cabinet will fall over with the wall, house and the world.
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This is what I ended up doing:
I screwed eyebolts into three studs in the wall
I screwed three eyebolts into the wooden blocks that were factory-screwed to the top of the cabinet I ran an 8-foot-long cable through each eyebolt
I used a turnbuckle to pull tight the looped ends of the cable (held by wire rope clips)
Now, when the "Big One" hits, the cabinet will fall over with the wall, house and the world.
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