suspended ceiling or ceiling tile

I have a utility room that I am finishing. One of the last pieces is what type of ceiling to install. I originally was going to put in a drop ceiling, but am now considering throwing up some 1x3s and attaching ceiling tile. My reasons are that it will be an easier install, cheaper and will probably look nicer. My hesitation on this is that it would be nice to have the suspended ceiling in this room to easily be able to get at where the electrical runs from the circuit box are, as the main circuit box is in this rooom and all the circuits in the house run from this room.
What are people's feelings towards having this easily accessible via a suspended ceiling as opposed to having to remove some pieces of "permanent" ceiling tile if there were to be a problem/upgrade needed electrically?
Thanks,
Scott
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The suspended ceiling is nice for access,but it mounts lower than tiles or sheetrock,especially if you want fixtures mounted in the T bar. If the ceiling beams above the electric panel,run in the direction of an unfinished area of the basement,it wouldn't matter since cables could be snaked above the ceiling. If they don't it would be a good idea to provide some kind of chase for future cables

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually that sounds like a fantastic idea. There is no basement, this is a slab. But what I could do is attach something to one of the beams to act as a chase, running this from directly above the electrical box into the adjacent room. This run would only be about 6 feet, the adjacent room has two drop ceilings unfortunately, but would at least be accessible. I could leave one panel above the electrical box somewhat accessible for removal when needed.
Thanks for the idea,
Scott

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/21/2004 7:39 AM US(ET), Scot took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

ceiling and a 5' x 3' closet in the outside corner where the electric, cable tv, telephone, and well water come into the house, all the rest of my basement has a dropped ceiling. I am sorry that I used the sheetrock in that one room, because every time I want to add an electrical circuit, tv cable, telephone line, add another water line, or have to run anything across the ceiling to another part of the house, I have to snake whatever it is through a small gap behind the wall framing near the top of the concrete wall for about 5' before I can gain access to the dropped ceiling to continue. I have been here about 20 years, and routed all sorts of new electric circuits (120 and 240), cables (TV, telephone, and Cat5), and a water tube (direct water from well, bypassing water softener) across the ceiling in that time. Except for that one 5' section, they have all been a breeze with the dropped ceiling. My next plan is to route another copper water line, bypassing the softener, for the outside sillcocks, which are currently connected in the entire water system. The only thing holding me up is that 5' section of wall framing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What does your local fire code require? Where I live if the utility room is conditioned by mechanical means it might need a drywall ceiling to meet our fire code. If the room was a direct access to the main attic then for sure it would need a fire rated ceiling, where I live.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/21/2004 10:29 AM US(ET), SQLit took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

builder installed a sheetrock ceiling above the baseboard hot water boiler. The exhaust pipe became triple walled before penetrating this sheetrock, and remained triple walled until it terminated above the roof. He said it was code (NY). It passed inspection.
--
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A dropped ceiling is not that tough to install if you have a little clearance. From the floor to the ceiling joists how much room do you have?
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I understand that it won't be that tough, I do actually have plenty of room to work with. That was just an additional reason to do a tile ceiling, as I still believe it will be easier. I just think the ceiling tile will look better and will be cheaper based on the pricing estimates I did. Just wasn't sure if I was sacrificing too much versatility by going that route.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think by the time you screwed around with getting the furring strips nailed, squared and whatnot the PITA factor would pay for the additional cost of the suspended. Also lights and ducts are easier with the suspended.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scot wrote:

like suspended ceilings. If I can think of any way around I will go with dry wall. It always looks better, and is more durable.
Bill Gill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.