Suspended ceiling edge

I'm remodeling my basement but would like to leave the suspended ceiling in for accessing wiring. However, I've knocked out a wall (actually just goes along the stair line now) and therefore if I were to hang the suspended ceiling, you would be able to see a 5-6" gap between the joist and suspended ceiling. This only happens on one side of the room. Is there any way that I can eliminate this gap or am I just better off throwing drywall on the ceiling. Thanks in advance.
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If you have the means to drywall.....DRYWALL all the way. This will look much more professional.
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Frame it with the suspended ceiling metal, cut tight panels to sit vertically.

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I would just build in a false beam to run the ceiling up against. If you have junction boxes in the ceiling you can not drywall over them. You need access to any box with wire connections in them. I have suspended ceilings in my basment. If I were to drywall the ceilings I would have to re-wire most of the main floor! Greg
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeff) wrote in message

Have you thought about tiling this gap with matching suspended ceiling materials. You may need to install some of the panels vertical instead of horizontal, but thats OK (may only need to get slightly inventive to secure the vertical tiles from tipping down). Even this is no concern if you can run at a non-vertical angle instead.
My biggest concern is asthetics of mismatching of new vs old materials.
-Bob Stan http://www.hbci.com/~sew4uicn ...I love simple things
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If you are insistent on leaving the suspended ceiling, I would find some new metal grid material and matching panels. If the panels can't be matched it isn't real expensive to replace all the panels. Now here is where it gets creative. Take some of the old panels, use them to fill the space you've created. You can then buy faux stained glass panels, or just the panels used for fluorescent lights. When the time comes, you could ad the lights. If it were me I would replace all the panels.
Dave

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Thanks for all the tips. I had decided to run a oak moulding border around where the gap was since the rest of the trim will be oak but then my brother stopped by and after a lengthy pros and cons session talked me into drywalling it. I don't have any junction boxes except where the old flourescent lights were. I'm going to be putting recessed lighting in instead and therefore won't have to deal with the old boxes. If I do need to move stuff I can move the boxes into a laundry area where it will be accessible.
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I am facing a similar problem and am planning to wrap large foam mouldings around the room just underneath the ceiling edge. I anticipate it will soften that industrial look of suspended ceilings (which I like however).
Another responder said drywall would look "more professional". I personally disagree. Some residential grade suspended ceilings look quite classy to my eye. And like you say, you get the access.
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