Sump Pump question


Is it better to have the check valve located at the base of the pump near the inlet or further away on the discharge pipe above the pump? Also, would two check valves be of advantage, one at the base another a couple of feet above the base? TIA
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One valve up, outside of the pit, is what you want. ANd don't forget to drill a small air relief hole drilled in the discharge pipe an inch above the pump angled down int othe pit. This prevents airlock.
You don't want the checkvalve screwing right into the pump. I recall reading that explicitly in instructions, though I have to confess i'm not entirely sure why. It may be that it prevents the inclusion of an air relief hole, dunno.
-- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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Todd H. wrote:

make cetrtain the area never freezes

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I have found little need for a check valve. I live in an area that freezes in winter. If you install a check valve it will hold water in the pipe allowing it to freeze and then the pump cannot remove any water.
When I originally installed it without the check valve, I found that the discharge end would end up submerged in the ditch and would siphon water back into the sump causing it to cycle on/off every couple of minutes. I had to break the siphon.
I decided that it was necessary to introduce air in the line to break the siphon and to allow the 90 foot run to the ditch to drain. At the time they didn't sell those devices for use in drains without a vent, but I had a spare foot valve for a well pump, I cut a tee into the discharge pipe added an 18 inch riser and installed the foot valve. When the pump pumps out the foot valve is closed so no water leaks out, but as soon at the pump turns off the weight of the water creates a vacuum which opens the foot valve and lets in air that drains the pipes back to the pump and to the ditch. This same foot valve has been in use with no problems since 1970. The only disadvantage is when the valve opens it makes sounds like an old man with bad gas, which isn't that bad, because when I hear the sound, I know it is working.

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That's why you put the check valve indoors, and angle the pipe downward so it will drain. I, too, live in an area that freezes in winter -- and I've *never* had that problem. Your problem was caused by poor drainage of the discharge line, not by the check valve.

That's why you use a check valve: so you don't siphon the ditch into your sump pit.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) writes:

Yup. Mine is above the pump, above the top of the sump, but quite indoors.
If you have a redundant pump system like a basement watchdog it should have its own checkvalve separate from the main pump, and the Y to the discharge heading outside should be above or downstream of both check valves.
-- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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wrote:

Yes, it probably was because the 1 1/2" poly line was not perfectly flat as it traveled 90 feet to the ditch. This is what happens when the final grade was done 4 months later by a bulldozer and compressed the soil. However, I have found that eliminating the check valve has eliminated any problems that could be caused by using it: frozen discharge line and the check valve sticking open. Using an air inlet valve was a simple and workable solution for the past 36 years.

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2 wrongs don't make a right.
But 3 "lefts" do.
I'd count yourself a lot luckier than smart about using a discharge without positive slope and making it work by eliminating a check valve.
Best Regards, -- Todd H. http://www.toddh.net /
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snipped-for-privacy@reply.in.this.group says...

Piffle. You didn't have any problems that were caused by using the check valve.

Caused by improper slope of the discharge line.

Caused by locating the check valve in an area subject to freezing.

If it works for you, fine -- but I agree with the other guy that said you were lucky, rather than good. I certainly wouldn't advise others to do as you did.
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One check valve, screw it into the pump.
--
Steve Barker



"Sudy Nim" < snipped-for-privacy@noplace.com> wrote in message
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Discharge side near the pump. I've never know anyone to put a check valve on the suction side. Always on the discharge.
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

If you did put the check valve on the suction side of the pump it would have the same effect as the foot valve on a portable pumps drafting hose. When a portable pump must pump against a high discharge pressure it must also have a discharge side check valve and a pressure release valve upstream of that check valve to allow the pump to start without trying to start against the back pressure of the standing water already in the discharge line. Submersible pumps such as sump pumps do not need an intake check valve and if one is installed it will cause excessive ware on the pump's motor by causing it to start under load.
--
Tom Horne

Well we aren\'t no thin blue heroes and yet we aren\'t no blackguards to.
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