Sump Pump Discharge Questions

Hi -
I recently bought a house with a flotec pedestal pump in a basement sump, and a terrible leaky flexible hose that the previous owners ran to a sink when needed. Based on last spring, the basement rarely floods - pump only ran after extended rain - at least two days continuous, heavy rain. Don't know about spring thaw - moved in after that.
I'm considering replacing the pedestal pump with a submersible (same brand, same hp 1/3).
Also want to install permanent discharge. Was planning to use the inexpensive flexible black plastic stuff for the run up to the sill, then put PVC through the sill, and outside. I bought some 1 1/4" PVC at home depot (they were out of elbows for 1 1/2". )
Here are my questions:
1) Submersible vs pedestal - any reason not to change? 1/3 hp enough for this kind of intermittent running? Rise is about 9 feet. 2) PVC - Okay to use 1 1/4 ? I've noticed other posts seem to recommend 1 1/2". Is there much difference? 3) I'm a bit nervous about drilling through my sill and siding (vinyl) - any special things I should know before I do that ? (Plan to use a hole saw on a corded drill). 4) Okay to let PVC run on surface downhill and just empty behind a hedge down the hill several feet? Some folks seem to be saying the discharge will smell terrible and mess up the lawn in the area it dumps. The gutter goes in the ground and I assume either runs to sewer or to drywell. Guy at home depot said don't tap into that or I might overflow the calculated capacity for that system. 5) People suggest various vacuum break systems - some say drill small hole just above check valve, others suggest adding T outside with riser - do I need the latter?
Thanks all for any help. Michael Jasper michael snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com
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snipped-for-privacy@mpi.com (MIchael Jasper) wrote:

Be sure your in the right place, as it is very hard to patch mistakes.

Look into the sump pit, and see what is in there! It sounds like it is ground water, which should be clear and reasonably clean. You won't have a problem, unless the sump discharges waster water (laundry, kitchen, etc output).

For best results, put the check valve right at the sump pump. It is when there is a pipe between them, that is when you can get airlock.
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On 18 Oct 2004 15:03:14 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mpi.com (MIchael Jasper) wrote:

Follow the printed recommendations from the pump manufacturer and you can't go wrong. Don't guess!!! Obviously, the longer the run, the bigger the pipe.
I personally would never use pvc outside the house - it degrades when exposed to ultraviolet light and gets brittle. It isn't so important with a drain line (as opposed to a pressurized water line) but why risk having to replace it in a few years? If it gets brittle and someone trips over the pipe it will shatter, probably where it exits the foundation. I would use galvanized steel outside the house, with the steel/ pvc joint located inside the basement and well clamped to a solid support.. Steel is more expensive, but how many times do you want to do this job?

I don't see any problems with your plan as long as the area you are discharging into slopes away from the house, doesn't flow onto a neighbor's lot, and erosion won't be a problem. It shouldn't smell - its ground water and rain water. I agree the discharge shouldn't go into the downspout drain, unless you know _for sure_ the drain pipe is clear of roots and debris and is extra large (4 inches). Then it might be ok. If the drain pipe ever clogs up you will have a real mess....

Install a check valve at the pump discharge outlet, as another poster suggested, Make sure the valve is readily accessible in case you need to remove it for cleaning. Important!!! - install a reducing tee and a small ball valve above the check valve so you can drain the discharge pipe for winterizatioon and servicing.
The real purpose of a vacuum breaker is to protect your potable water system. I don't see any reason you would have any need for one on a sump pump.

Call your local building inspector and ask what is local code. As the homeowner you may deviate from code if you really want to, but it is safer in terms of selling your home to make sure any modifications meet code. Especially with a highly visible and important sump pump system.
John
John Davies TLCA 14732 http://home.comcast.net/~johnedavies / '96 Lexus LX450 '00 Audi A4 1.8T quattro Spokane WA USA
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I think he is referring to the outlet, one might want a way to break the vacuum, when the pump is off, so that the pipe will drain, which could be important if it is subject to freezing.
This is where you would put in a "Y" or "T" fitting, at the top end of the drain run, so that it will drain on its own. Probably un-needed in a low use situation, and you would have to be careful of that the pipe doesn't plug downstream, since that would overflow.
So that is a mixed bag, with good and bad.
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snipped-for-privacy@mpi.com (MIchael Jasper) wrote in message
THis is some additional info to my original post. I looked a bit more carefully at where the discharge might exit to the outside. From what I've seen in DIY books, the best thing would be to go through the rim joist. In much of my basement, the rim joist is bare and easily accessed. However, along about 1/2 of the wall where the pump sits, the area right above the sill plate is covered with insulation, and when I peel it away, I see bricks and mortar (quite old) there, instead of a joist. Not sure what to make of this... the water pipe for the external spigot exits through the brick, but was patched around with mortar.
So, given this, since I'm not inclined to figure out how to make a 2" hole in the bricks, I can either go through the sill plate itself, or take the hose over to the adjoining wall (about 6' away), where the joist is bare - but then I'll come out where the driveway is, so will need to get the discharge back to the front of the house to avoid icing up the driveway.
This shouldn't be this complicated!
Thanks for any help, Michael
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