Stupid cedar roof question

At some point in the next few years, I'm going to have to replace my roof.
Homeowners assoc is VERY strict about what can be used.... some of the newer types of "fake" wood shingles are allowed, but I don't like their appearance. But for the most part, they only allow cedar shingles.
Anyway, I was just wondering why no one ever seals their shingles with something similar to what is used on decks.
Is it due to an increased fire hazard (over and above what is pretty much already a fire just waiting to happen)? Too much added weight? Screws up the water flow?
I guess what I'm getting at is I love the look of a newly installed cedar roof, but that look only lasts a couple years before it's faded to gray..... just wondering if anyone has any info on how to maintain that "new" look for as long as possible.
Thanks Matt
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Matt wrote:

If one were to go, on a sunny day, into the attic of a house that is correctly shingled with cedar shingles, one would see a universe of pinholes of sunlight. This is due to the nature of cedar. When the rain falls on the roof, the shingles soak up the first rain that falls and swell, thus sealing the holes and preventing leaks. Once the rain goes away, the cedar shrinks back to its normal dry size and the holes reappear. Sealing the shingles would prevent this from happening and probably cause problems.
OTOH, I have used boiled linseed oil on cedar shingles to help preserve them, but to keep them new looking, one would have to do this probably every few months.
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In a previous posting, Usenet was endowed with the following text from

[snip]
With all due respect, you completely miss the appeal of cedar entirely. People choose cedar for the same reason they choose copper; they revere the aging process, which gives a weathered, rustic look that blends with the natural surroundings. If you don't appreciated what cedar does best, you should use a different material, probably a synthetic, to match your sense of beauty.
RC
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Aw man, if I need a weathered, rustic look - I'll just start looking at my wife again. And don't think I havn't tried replacing her with a synthetic.
But the synthetic won't clean the house..... the day it does however - SHE IS GONE.
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Our roofing guy came back a year later and applied a sealer to the cedar shingles. The salt air here makes the cedar turn dark quickly, so this stops the process. If we don't use sealer about every 5 years, the shingles will not only weather dark in color, but deteriorate. (this is in New England) As for your supposedly funny remarks about your wife, I deplore your cruelty.
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Oh Carol, chill out. I'm not even married.
Jeezy Weezy.
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Sorry, Matt. I'm not a regular so I don't recognize humor without obvious clues such as smiley-faces. Anyway, the shingle sealing info I gave you is correct. Your wife will love it (smiley-face here).
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