Stuck Jalousie Windows


I'm trying to fix some jalousie windows in my late mother's house. The operators are no good and I managed to get them off of the frame by breaking off the rusted bolts. But the windows won't open or close at all, I suspect that the hinges have corrosion in the pins (all of which seem to be aluminum). Any ideas of how to unstick all the mechanisms? Would it help to use a blow torch on the hinges?
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SMS wrote:

i dont think the warden wants you to open the jailhouse window.
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Spray WD40
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wrote:

might work, but only if they are "slightly" stuck. I'd recommend PB Blaster or Kroil and yes, a torch might be required if they are really stuck.
nate
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If the house is near the ocean, the aluminum is probably pitted. Even if they're not, there's probably still corrosion. You'll have to disassemble the window to find out where the binding is taking place. If you have to replace a pin, you can use pop rivets. http://www.realestatewebmasters.com/blogs/mikey/6619/show / Here's a link on how to repair jalousie windows and it has a link to a parts supply place. http://www.ehow.com/how_2077862_repair-jalousie-windows.html
R
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On Wed, 10 Feb 2010 15:33:46 -0800 (PST), SMS

Try WD 40 at the pivot points. Open the windows from the outside. A hand on each end of one glass (grasp the metal) and gently lift. Careful you can crack that glass.
Forget the torch :)
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I used brake fluid on some that were really cruded up after trying WD40 first and it worked much better. Used Lithium Soap in the cranks.
Jimmie
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Yeah, that's the second half of the problem, how to keep them from resticking.
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wrote:

Get rid of the damned things.is best.
Jimmie
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You are probably overmatched on this project. Call some window professionals, preferably people who also do repairs, and get estimates, quotes. Jalousies are inherently complicated things and it will be surprising if any of them can be revived. as suggested by another, replacement will likely turn out to be your best option long term.
Joe
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Please. The jalousie windows may have some architectural or historical significance to the building.
OP wants them open, so he can fix them.
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Oren wrote:

They don't. I don't know why on earth they used jalousies on that one window. It's a window between the outside, and partial concrete wall on a screened in patio. You can still buy jalousie windows, but not in the height of these windows.
We are selling the house as part of an estate and we will just leave it the way it is. Putting in two awning windows will cost about $400, and given the housing market in south Florida it's not worth fixing it because it will not make the house easier to sell or gain us anything close to $400 in return. With housing values going down at 2% a month around there, and competing against all these short sales and foreclosures, one inoperable window is not going to matter.
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