storage shed question

All of the sheds I've looked at have the door on the gable end. Does the door on the gable side have advantages that a door on the eave side doesn't or is it just a matter of aesthetics? I'm going to be getting a 10x8 shed with the door on the 10' side.
Thanks...
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Also, though its a small shed, the gable end is 'non-load-bearing', so putting the door there is simpler.
Dave
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Hmmm, I've had 3 sheds, and none of them had doors on the gable ends. All had doors on the eave sides. Perhaps it's just a size issue, putting a door in an 8' wall?
al wrote:

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al wrote:

I bought a 10' x 18' gambrel-roof shed 4 years ago.
It came standard with a gable-end double door. I ordered it with an optional second double-door, on the eave side (18' side).
The gable-end door is higher so I don't hit my head. The eave-side door isn't as high, and I have to be careful when entering & exiting.
As far as water is concerning, neither door leaks.
Having 2 doors makes it more convenient to access the shed when the riding mower is parked inside and blocking one of the doors.
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Mine is on the eave side, but I'll probably add one on the gable end to the left for better access.
Here's my 8X12, with added shed roof, bench and sink. http://www.flickr.com/photos/joearnold/?saved=1
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Click on the small pics for larger, then click on 'all sizes'.
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Doorways on the gable end don't dump as much snow/water/ice on the heads of people going in and out.
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Doorways on the short side of a shed favor large equipment and long boards etc. Doorways on the long side favor people and small objects and maximize use of storage in the corners of the structure. The gable and eves can be on either the short or long wall, particularly for a small structure like a shed.
Ask yourself what you plan to use it for and what access to the yard is best. Other than that, its a coin flip IMO
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al wrote:

Great Topic, I just had a 10x12 Storage Shed built on my driveway with a gambrel roof, and the door on the gable end. And a workbench and eave storage.
I have a small window and a skylight, but no overhead light, or power.
That's my question, how many folks just run an extension cord into the shed from an exterior outlet for tools, light, etc. And how many had it properly wired by an electrical pro?
Is there any obvious option that I am overlooking regarding electricity?
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Personally I favor the extension cord plan, you don't have to have it inspected, or taxed as it is a temporary structure. In my green house we wired it properly, but the hook-up is a 10 ga extension cord running to a gfi box mounted high on the wall of the house. The same goes for the water, it is plumbed on the inside but the hook-up is a hose. It permanently temporary.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

covered by a lid.
In the shed, I installed an outlet electrical strip, (no sure of what it is really called), and from it I have a radio plugged in, a security monitor, and extra slots for a heater, etc.
Works great.
Kate
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I built our shed many years ago. It's 8'x12' with the door centered on the 12' side, under the roof eave. There are a couple of advantages I've noted over the years.
1. Having the door centered on the long side of the building makes it easier to store items on the left and right side as you walk in. You don't have to go to the back of a 12' shed to get what you need. Much easier access.
2. Having the door under the eave lets you stand in the doorway while it's raining, and helps keep water out of the shed if the door is open during a rainstorm.
I think the main reason most "kit" sheds have doors on the gable end is so the roof can be lower. The shed has to be taller than the door to install a door on the eave side.
As for power, I ran conduit underground from our house to our shed, and ran a 30 amp circuit to a subpanel in the shed. For now, I just have a couple of lights and some outlets. It's a nice feature when I have to go out to the shed at night, or need to plug in the charger for my lawnmower battery.
Anthony
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