Storage building siding options...Hardiboard?


Hello, all.
I will be constructing a simple 10' x 10' outside storage building in my backyard this summer. A 4" concrete pad has already been poured, and as I plan construction, I am considering exterior siding options. I have read quite a bit about Hardiboard vertical siding material. This product, which apparently comes in 4' x 8' sheets, is paintaile and rot-resistant. However, I've also read that it is a bear to cut, and dry-cutting produces some really *bad* silica dust that should be avoided.
So, my initial enthusiasm for Hardiboard has been tempered, and thus I'm still considering other options. I would appreciate any suggestions. I don't mind (and, in fact, would prefer) to paint the exterior rather than rely on product color that may fade/vary over time, as vinyl does.
The storage shed will be a pretty simple structure; wood-framed walls on 16" centers w/ 1/2" plywood sheathing.
TIA for any ideas.
-intrepid
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 Apr 2007 09:04:22 -0700, intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What weather and environmental conditions is it expected to withstand? how long is it supposed to last? Is the siding going to be structural, or will the wood framing provide wracking resistance without the siding? Does it need to be pretty?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It is not hard to cut with powered whirly-sharp blades. It is, however, a bit hard on the blades, so use carbide tipped whirly-sharps

By avoided, you want to keep as much of it out of your eyes and respiratory system as possible. Goggles and a face mask solve that problem nicely.
--
"So long, so long, and thanks for all the fish!"
Dave
www.davebbq.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Vinal is final and very easy to work with. I put aluminum on mine to match my house. VERY EXPENSIVE option With vinal buy a double 4 or Dutch lap not the straight 8 stuff and buy the heavy gauge. Install over osb board Use the artificial composite trim It wont rot Steel Doors for security Spend a little more in the beginning and make it totally maintenance free I put a old window frame on mine with mirror glass in it to give the appearance of a window but it is still secure I also installed a spickot on the outside from the sprinkler system main line Alarm system also tied to house system Four security light all tied together. A double 2x8 across the header to allow the use of a come along for working on the mower

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Affordable options pretty much limit you to vinyl or the hardie product. Cutting the hardie outside is no big deal. A simple dust mask and eye protection is enough.
I would avoid lap siding and T-111. They just won't hold up long term from the rain splatter. BTDT.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree with you Colbyt simply because people won't keep up the maintenence on it. They really should put the low maintenance $ into it up front.
But for those who have up front constraints and use it, keep it away from the ground as far as possible. Prime it! Especially THE EDGES towards the ground. PRIME the couple of feet up the back too. Don't use cheapo paint.
Another option is to run a 12" wide Hardiplank http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner/prodhome/harditrim.php on the bottom around the perimeter then start T111 above that.
There is a channel made to join horizontal separations but do not know if this will work if both pcs are not T111. And it can be ugly.
More attactive way to join is use some billion year caulk (hmmm..wonder if roofing cement would work?) in the joint prime and paint. Put a 1x4 trim board (primed front and back) over the joint but first bevel the top edge along the lengh on a table saw like:
|\\ | | | | | |
--
Before mounting over joint put some more billion year caulk (roofing
cement bad idea here) along the back of the top edge so it squishes out
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
intrepid snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Although you may have to make a few cuts with your circular saw, you can rent or buy a shear made especially to cut hardie panels and boards. Absolutely no dust, just long curlicues of hardie board.
I haven't cut any hardipanel with a saw in years. I still cut hardieplank with a chop saw, but I use the blade made for cutting it and there is very little dust.
Here are some sources for the products I am talking about;
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
<<http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/SoftCart.exe/a/hitachi/hardiplank_blades.htm?L+coastest+xszn8925ffe336e3+1177583800
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I built a 10x16 shed last year, I know what you're going through. I looked at all the siding options too. I considered the 4x8 sheets of hardie board also, but decided to pass. This siding was to be installed vertically, and joining 2 pieces on the same stud is iffy. This is true because you'd have to nail really close to the edge. ( this is the kiss of death for any cement siding product) They recommended that the studs be doubled up where 2 pieces come together. In the end, I decided that was too much hassle.
I went with raw 5/8" T1-11 plywood siding, grooved 8" OC instead. This was no picnic either. The siding was raw, so I primed it, both sides complete on sawhorses before putting it up. (a major hassle) Then I had to paint it once the building was done.
The building looks great, but 2 coats of primer on both sides of the sheet and paint on the one side of the sheet was more work than I wanted to do. (the white primered sheets look nice inside though) If I could do it again, I'd sheet it with 7/16" OSB and side it with vinyl or Hardie Plank.
Other things to consider: I went with a Gambrel (Barn-Style) roof, so that I could have a storage loft above. *Very* nice to have some extra room. I also did not want to hassle with swinging doors so I put on a low-headroom 8x7 garage door instead. (I had 8' sidewalls) The garage door with low-headroom kit was expensive, (300 bucks) but well worth it!
Good Luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wow!!
All kinds of great information, folks. Many thanks for sharing your expertise.
After reading the above, and doing some additional research, I think I've come across still another alternative that I will likely pursue, and that's SmartSide panel siding from LP. No silica component, therefore no silica dust, and no special cutting tools or blades required. It's also pre-primed like the Hardi stuff, and it's about $5 cheaper per 4' x 8' sheet...given the 10 sheets I'll need, that's $50 plus tax in my pocket.
As for some of the other questions; appearance-wise, it doesn't have to be a showpiece, but it will be trimmed and painted a color roughly similar to the brick on our home, and the trim painted white. Construction, as noted, will be 2" x 4" studs on 16" centers, with 1/2" plywood sheathing, then the SmartSide panel atop that. Roof is a simple 7-pitch gable style with a weathered-wood 25-year or better shingle. I plan to build two simple swinging 2' x 6' doors for the front.
Have probably built this thing in my head 4,000 times, including drawing of plans and creation of a cut schedule, and a template for the roof commons (down to the birdsmouth), but the planning has already helped me anticipate a few gotchas now rather than later. I'm sure there are plenty to come....
-intrepid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like you got 'er all planned out. Planning is the key. It won't take you too long to get it done. Since you've already got the cement, you're halfway home! After I poured the cement for mine, it took about 3 weekends to get it finished. Putting on the garage door and wiring inside took most of one of the weekends.
Good luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
All
This isn't strictly tied to the original topic of my thread, but its about the same building...
Can anyone share any experiences with city/municipality building inspectors wrt simple storage buildings like this? That is, this building won't have any utilties, no interior finish (just raw studs), but should I expect any final inspections to hold me to the letter-and- chapter of a full *residential* building code like IBC 2003?
As an example - the IBC calls for treated lumber for sill plates coming in contact with a concrete slab, or an "impenetrable moisture barrer" between the plate and the concrete. While that makes complete sense for a full residence, isn't a bit over the top for a storage shed? Wouldn't a caulked and gasketed sill plate with untreated lumber accomplish the intended objective?
I'm not trying to skirt any of the rules, but by the same token I don't want this simple building to turn in to an overbuilt monster when all it'll do is hold ladders, lawn mowers, and shovels, if that makes any sense..
Thanks,
-intrepid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like using "rough sawn plywood". It's like T-111, without the grooves. Rough sawn plywood is commonly used for the underside of roof soffits, so it's usually easy to find.
(IMO, Standard grooved T-111 makes a building look like an apartment complex, and is only as strong as the thickness in the grooves).
One of the advantages is it serves as both sheathing and siding which makes the walls faster and less expensive to contruct.
It comes in various thicknesses from 1/4" up to at least 5/8", depending on the strength and span rating you need.
It's a standard wood product, so it's easy to cut, nail, etc. It takes paint well, but I prefer to use an opaque stain. I spray on the stain for ease of application, since the rough texture is hard to roll or brush.
I used the rough plywood for our shed (now over 16 years old), our garage, our pumphouse (18 years old), and our house. Here's a few example pictures:
www.mountain-software.com/siding1.jpg www.mountain-software.com/siding2.jpg www.mountain-software.com/siding3.jpg
I use metal "Z-flashing" at all horizontal joints, and caulk all vertical joints using polyurethane caulk (PL Series available at home centers).
I try to keep all wood AT LEAST six inches from the ground, though my shed and pumphouse are on 4" slabs and haven't shown any rot problems in 18 years.
Try to control water/mud splashing up on the walls by installing gutters, or putting gravel or barkdust around the building.
Of course, annual maintenance (washing the walls, repainting when necessary) helps a lot too.
Hope this helps,
Anthony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.