Spraying water on an A/C condensor?

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wrote:

Window unit generally do that. not on central units.
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interesting, ....how do they do that?
Mark
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They have what Friedrich calls a slinger ring on the fan that picks up the water and splashes it on the condensor. Despite what Lena posted, they still have them. (The installation manual for this one is dated 10/97, but I think the unit is only about 4 years old)
But something annoys me and I wanted to get all of your opinions. The installation instructions say, in every sketch of each different way of installing this room air conditioner that the unit should slope down 3/8" from the wall or window to the outside-most edge.
But neither the operating or install instructions say why, or give any indication that they use a slinger ring (I only thought to ask because I saw slinger rings mentioned here), or that if the unit slopes too much, the water will overflow out before the slinger ring can get it. That's true, right?
So at work they installed the AC correctly, but after 3 years something slipped and now the outer edge is 2 inches down, not 3/8".
So for more than a year it's been sagging and there seemed no real reason to correct that, because Friedrich didn't say a word. So we were losing out on cooling, and paying more for electricity, also, right?
I wrote them to be sure, and got a dry answer with no apology.
I think they should change the manual. What do you think??

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The slope is usually to assure that water does not drip back into the house. There is a drain pan under the evaporator coil to send the water to the slinger ring. The pan may have some slope built into it.

Maybe. It depends on the amount of humidity in your region. In a dry climate it would make no difference.

I would hope so, you asked about getting rid of water :)
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wrote:

I'm not there very often. It's actually my friend's workplace.
One day I was there, after the AC was tipped 2 inches, the water was coming out of the AC in a continuous stream, and falling on the ground. Heavy enough that it didn't break in to separate globs of water for the first 3 or 4 feet (the amount I could see.)
If having a slinger ring is a good idea, I think she was losing out on 90 or 95% of the effectiveness of it.

I should have said it was Baltimore. I'm sure there are exceptional days but dry here is 40%, maybe a little less, and it's often over 70% iirc.

Good one. :)

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Well, it was an *installation manual*, right? Not a theory of operation. And the 'word' they said was have "a 3/8" inch slope". I agree that the manual should say that this slope is needed for optimum efficiency and energy conservation.
lee h
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On Tue, 01 Aug 2006 23:32:03 GMT, "lee houston"

Neither the installation nor the operation manual mentions it. I think both should say that it is important to have it at the right angle.
I've read owners manuals that explain things. They don't have to give patent secrets, but if they had said why, when it sagged, my friend would have gotten it fixed.

OK, good enough.

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mm wrote:

The 3/8 inch downslope is to ensure POSITIVE extraction of the condensed water. They don't want you complaining that the floor is always wet under the AC and thereby have to pay for repairs to the floor and adjacent wall.
With a 2 inch downslope, it is then a bit doubtful that the slinger ring is in contact with the water. At 3/8 inch, the mfg is also saying that condensate is forming an air seal under the unit to keep the hot air outside. At 2 inch slope it is likely that the water seal is not in place and you are leaking hot air to the office.
Get the AC people back out to re-level the unit.
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wrote:

Thanks a lot, Robert. The first point you make I thought might be the case and I appreciate your saying so. The second point, I hadn't even thought of.
They had hired an independent guy to install it, and he's disappeared, but they can hire someone else now. I think if he had been around, they would have this fixed already, but it's easy to let things slide when they know of no particular reason to re-level it. That's what annoyed me about the manual.
I didn't snip anything above because I'm sending my friend a copy of this. (It's my friend's job, not mine.)
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Mark wrote:

The fan has a ring on it that extends its reach into the drip pan. It then lifts a small amount of the drip pan water up and flings it onto the condenser coil. Central units cannot do that as they are separated from the condenser by many feet of wood, insulation and brick/stucco/siding, Now a resourceful chap might figure out a way to re-route the central AC drain water (cleaner as pollen and most dust are trapped by the furnace filter) outside to the top of the condenser and drip the water between the edge of the fan blade and its shroud. The fan would then throw the water outwards to the coil when the fan is running.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Don't try it on any unit not designed for it. In other words, don't try it on any home A/C.
I believe the main problem has been corrosion, whether the condenser precooler used municipal water or evaporator runoff, or whether the water was sprayed or evaporated from a wick. When these devices started to become popular in the mid-1970s, one A/C manufacturer in the southwest, Goettl, expressly warned that the use of any such device would void their warranties. By about 1990, precoolers became rare, and all you'd see left of them were their metal frames with their wicks removed.
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Trickling rainwater over my window AC works fine, raising the COP 20%.
Nick
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Water source heat sinking is not uncommon in Florida.
Beachfront high-rise condominiums used well water for this purpose, draining to the ocean. In Ft Lauderdale, the water table was lowered by decades of this practice, resulting in salt infiltration, and now the buildings have to use closed systems circulating to heat exchangers on the rooftops.
Some single-family houses here are cooled with pond water, if available. I have also seen swimming pools used for this, although it is opposite to the season for pool heating.
Your ordinary split-system air-cooled condensers work much more efficiently when rain falls on them.
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On 1 Aug 2006 11:22:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I hose off my condenser from time to time to keep it clean. I also remove any leaves, dirt, wasp nests, etc that accumulates around the tower being careful not to bend the fins.
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my freind did that at his grocery store on the freezer condensers. it cut his electric about half. he just cleaned the coils with something like lime away every year. he basically put misters in the condenser room.
http://www.minibite.com/america/malone.htm
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On 1 Aug 2006 11:22:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

The principle works. Some AC units have a water bath for the coils to sit in while the water is airated.
Some are even residental sized.
As far as using a garden hose, I don't think he wants you to stand there all day, but maybe clean your coils.
Just guessing...
tom @ www.Consolidated-Loans.info
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