Soundproofing traffic noise

I'm looking for anyone with experience solving a soundproofing issue. I have the privilege of owing a nice condo at a beach resort, but I really don't sleep well there due to the constant traffic noise. The condo is about 30 yards from the costal highway and it can get quite loud. Apparently it's very cool to alter your truck's exhaust system and rev the engine at 2:00 am. Are guys modifying the motorcycle exhaust systems too?
The building is concrete with a dryvit styrofoam facing, so I think that's doing a fine job of noise reduction. The bulk of the noise seems to be coming through the sliding glass doors at the south end of the unit. One in the master BR and one in the LR.
These glass sliders look to be cheap builders grade low cost doors. They slide fine, don't leak in storms, and generally work ok, but they are your basic 6' sliders. I want to keep the glass doors because they connect to the balcony, let in light, and give nice views.
Should I look into buying new glass doors? Do I go top of the line name brand from the local vendor, or are some better than others?
I did read that adding a 2nd door outside the original will help, but I'm not sure I want that drastic of a solution.
What about rolling blinds? The kind that roll up into an exterior box at the top of the window. Will these just block light, or do they actually help with traffic noise.
I'm sure there are other folks who have similar issues, how did you solve them?
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I am amazed how many people think it is cool to generate noise by altering the exhaust system on their motorcycles or trucks.
I remember being about 8 years old and discovering you could tie a balloon on your bike to make noise. I did that for a while and outgrew it and as an adult I have no interest in reverting to childhood.
It is pretty difficult to block that high of a noise level at those frequencies.
How about contacting everyone involved to enforce existing noise requirements. Get your neighbors involved too.

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote in news:as2583p4l7s4o87i393esc0qdiuaofccj4@ 4ax.com:

Not necessarily solved the sound pollution problem but have helped it by installing double pane windows and sliding door. Big difference in sound over the old single pane, aluminum frame windows and sliding door. Have you considered adding storm shutters? You could close them when sleeping and retract them when you wanted the view. I'm thinking of the segmented aluminum storm shutter that retracts into a roll above the window or door.
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I talked to a local company http://www.alutech.com/ about storm shutters but they didn't have any information about noise reduction. They generally just do these for weather protection. I'm curious if the shutters actually help reduce traffic noise.
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If you are replacing the sliding doors look for triple pane. Like the double pane glass units the triple panes are better for heat insulation, and should improve sound blocking. I also read somewhere that glass units made with different thicknesses of glass, unlike most units that have all the glass sheets the same thickness, different thicknesses of glass supposedly will vibrate at different frequencies and reduce the noise transmitted.
Heavy drapes will also cut down on noise transmission.

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote in

My recollection is that they cut down on wind noise but that is a 20+ year old memory. Maybe somebody else can share recent experience?
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

http://www.soundproofing.org /
In general you want to block air exchange. Air caries sound very well. (Try opening your car's window as a train is going by.)
Next you want weight. Heavy things (drywall lead sheets etc.) block sound well. In your case double pane glass doors.
You also want to prevent any direct solid connections. Stagger wall studs or use special isolation devices to keep the sound from traveling through the wall (remember the two cans on a string (well wire actuarially worked) you want to break the wire).
Filling in wall cavities with sound absorbing materials (accustical fiberglass bats) will do a little.
Point source control (special absorption material) at the source of the sound will also help. This might be plants or walls of some sort to re-direct or absorb the noise.
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Joseph Meehan

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It's probably worth pulling the inner trim to see what was used to seal around the frame. Expanding foam seals better than fiberglass. If the builders were lazy, there may be nothing at all.
--
Warren Block * Rapid City, South Dakota * USA

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Call the cops about that. There are noise laws that will deal with that problem. No amount of insulation, new doors or new whatever will fix that.
As for the doors, don't get aluminum framed anything. I'd also vote for french doors rather than sliding doors. Why? The french doors pull in and seal against something. the top & bottom edge of the sliding doors don't push against anything to seal; they rely on fabric weatherstrips that wear out & let sound in. French doors are probably more thug-resistant too; it's pretty easy to take a sliding door out of it's track from the outside (lift it up, unless something's in the top track to prevent that) and of course can be forced open.
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On Wed, 27 Jun 2007 21:21:56 -0600, Bob M. wrote:

I just put in a sliding glass patio door at my girl's house and you're right, that whole sliding panel will pop out with just a small prybar. I didn't tell her that, don't want her to have nightmares.
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says...

This could be a regional issue, having to do with energy codes, but there are sliding doors available that have very durable non-fabric weatherstripping that seals very effectively against noise as well as air movement. Noise insulation and temperature insulation aren't the same thing, of course, but you might look at sliding doors designed for colder winters. I'd also suggest one with a deadbolt lock that keeps it from being lifted off its tracks.
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besides the other suggestions of installing triple pane windows/doors, heavy (I mean really heavy) drapes and curtains will absorb alot of sound.
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gut walls, have expanding foam installed, excellent insulation and sound proofing, install low noise drywall, can be mounted on noise reduction holders but you lose a inch or two of room. install new noise reduction windows, possibly storm shutters, heavy drapes too.
then create some white noise indoors, leave a box fan running, a noise generator, rain drops, nice noises like that.
see town council have them put up siigns on the highway no jake brakes between 9 pm and 6 am.
talk to your neighbors the noise must be bugging them too. besides they may have some creative solutions
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Normal homeowners should not need to wear earplugs, perform extensive alterations or live in a bunker to block such noise. The answer is to stop the noise.
We lobbied our town and they passed a "use of jake brakes prohibited" ordinance. It turns out other companies make that equipment and Jacobs felt they were being picked on so the signs were changed to "use of brake retarders prohibited"
Pretty much most of the towns in my area have passed such ordnances.
And actually the problem isn't the brake retarders it is when they are fitted on a truck with a highly modified exhaust system typically driven by an 8 year old truck driver. There is no muffler to attenuate that sharp "braap-braap-braap" noise.

The Harley with no muffler racket also seems to be declining after people like me complained to their state legislators to revoke the inspection privileges from motorcycle shops that allow bikes with modified/no mufflers to pass inspection.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I have been researching windows for noise reduction for my home, although not as drastic a situation as you have.
As you describe it, it's not a just a matter of "double pane" or "triple pane" windows. You need specially designed ones that have laminated glass. For such an extreme situation, laminated glass is the only thing that will make much difference. The bad news is the it is VERY expensive.
One company I have looked at has a "quite line" or maybe it's called serenity. Anyway, check out http://www.milgard.com/ and find the sound control windows. They come in different STC ratings (higher the better and also more expensive). Again, these will run you at least two to three times the cost of regular dual pane windows. Other brands offer these too, usually used around airports.
One suggestion: when getting a replacement window contractor, see if there is a "glass shop" in your city that does the replacements and hopefully carries a good quality brand. Unlike most of the replacement guys who have jumped into this now popular field, the glass shop guys usually are much more educated on noise issues.
-- John
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If it's bothering you, it's probably bothering the neighbors as well. Perhaps the condo association will plant some evergreen trees as a sound barrier? Or a fence?
Though as someone else said, you should work on getting the noise stopped, not just blocking it.
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