Solid Fuses: Visible Indicator If Blown?

Page 5 of 5  
On Sat, 21 Sep 2013 21:50:29 -0500, Dean Hoffman

They also make an indicating fuse with a metal plunger that pops out when it blows. These are usually used in a holder with a sense rail. The plunger pops out, hits the rail and indicates a blown fuse. (light, beeper or whatever)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/21/2013 10:53 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I had fuses like in some surplus gear that had a panel mount fuse holder equipped with a clear cap having a bubble in it that the plunger popped up into when the fuse blew. The little tips of the plungers on some of the fuses were painted red so they would show up more easily in the bubble but it was easy to tell if the unpainted tips were in the bubble window of the cap too. I suppose that little fuse would work in a fuse holder that had an electrical contact to turn on an indicator light. I had some fuses under the dash in my van that had a tiny LED which would light if the fuse blew. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Light fuses sounds good. Since the fuse blows, and you likely still hvae 12 volts to work with. The 20 mA or so through the LED and resistor won't do much damage to any thing.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/22/2013 8:15 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At work there are thosands of fuses. Many of them are in holders that have neon bulbs for voltages over 100 volts and LEDs in them for the 24 volt circuits. Makes finding a bad fuse easy most of the time.
Some of the larger fuses have a set of contacts on the side that are normally open. When the fuse blows the contacts close and light up an indicator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Have you ever seen a motorized circuit breaker controlled by a 3-strike relay? We had them in the LORAN-C transmitters I used to work on. These transmitters were subject to the random arc which would trip the high voltage breaker in the power supply.
Picture a large circuit breaker above a motor with a shaft the rose out of the top. When the motor was energized, the shaft pushed the breaker handle up, energizing the high voltage Power Supply. (25K VDC max, steady state at 15K) the motor would then spin back down retracting the shaft.
Controlling the motor circuit was a mechanized relay with a timer and a cam that opened and closed the relay contacts. If the transmitter arced and tripped the breaker, the cam would rotate 1 position, start a 30 second timer and power up the motor which would close the circuit breaker. If 30 seconds went by with no more arcs, the relay cam would rotate back to its "normal" position and wait patiently for the next arc. If another arc occurred within those 30 seconds, the cam would rotate one more position, power up the motor, close the breaker and once again wait for another arc. If, within the original 30 seconds a 3rd arc occurred, the cam would rotate one more position and shut down the power supply.
At that point, if everything else was working properly, other circuitry would automatically power up the standby transmitter and switch the antenna coupler to the standby unit, putting us back on air in under a minute.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/22/2013 10:17 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Were you in The Coast Guard? Those transmitters put out some incredible power but I seem to recall them being shut down only to wind up being considered as a backup because of the possibility of GPS being jammed or knocked out by solar flares. Heck, the government will probably wind up with some sort of system like it if GPS were to turn out to be somehow vulnerable. As tall as the towers were for LORAN-C, was lighting a big cause of the systems going down and switching to backup transmitters? o_O
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I spent a year at USCG LorSta Sylt Germany. Sylt is a resort island in the North Sea with casinos, all variety of night life and nude beaches. I paid for it with a year at USCG LorSta Port Clarence Alaska. Night life consisted of double deck Pinochle, hours upon hours of Cribbage and poker with the Eskimos when Port Clarence Bay froze over so they could cross it by snow mobile. I spent my last year as an instructor at the Loran training center on Governor's Island, NY. My home town was NYC, so they basically sent me home for my last year.
If I recall correctly, Loran stations across the globe began being shutdown in the early 90’s. Many stations went solid state and unmanned years before that. All remaining Loran C service was terminated in 2010. I don't know which, if any, Loran chains are still available as backup for GPS. I do know that some stations were dismantled and towers taken down.
Check out this video of the tower at Port Clarence.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=u92YYdy6Lak
Lightening hit our tower in Germany, basically melting the antenna coupler transformer. We were off air for a few weeks while we waited for parts to rebuild the antenna coupler and final amplifier stage of the transmitter that was on-air at the time. I don't remember how it worked, but there was some kind of system that handled most strikes without knocking us off the air. This one was just too big.
Interesting fact about the construction of Loran stations: Even though the guy wire system was designed to spin the tower basically straight down should there be a tower failure, each Loran station was built so that the closet building to the tower, other than the transmitter building of course, was no closer to the base of the tower than the tower was high. In the next-to-impossible case that the tower fell "sideways" it would miss the buildings.
Since the weather in Port Clarence was an issue, we had a 1/4” mile enclosed "hallway" from the main station to the transmitter building. No heat and very little light, but at least we were out of the weather as we walked (or biked) to the transmitter building. The inside walls were coated with ice and there were snowdrifts inside the hallway where the snow blew through the seams in the walls.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/22/2013 5:17 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Darn, I lost the pictures I took when I worked at The Kwajalein Missile Range back in the 1980's during the SDI "Star Wars" program. There were some cool old and new structures out there for radio and radar use. I do believe the big satellite dish for the down link had a cryogenically cooled receiver or components to give it maximum sensitivity. There were some abandoned old sites that still had the antennas and there was one big concrete building that was used for the original phased array radar development for the early warning and ships phases array radars. I really wish I hadn't lost those pictures years ago. o_O
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwajalein_Atoll
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wonder if the old antennas can be used for short- wave listening, or some other use, now days?
I remember hearing a story that may well be true. Someone in England during world war two, set up listening post, and scanned the airwaves. Due to freik of atmospherics, they were able to listen to the tank corps of the Germans in Africa, on about 28 MHz. This provided a bit of tactical advantage to the English.
I remember in the late 1980s, I used to hear Galveston, TX on my CB radio at home. I never did talk to anyone. But QSL cards were popular then, and so any time anyone gave out zip code and PO box, I'd write and tell them they were coming through in NYS. A couple of them wrote back.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/25/2013 12:24 AM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In the 70's working at NASA tracking station, we used loran to track cesium clock drift. There was a special receiver for that. Loran C and D. The only other way to measure cesium clock, was for them to bring in a portable reference.
We also had cooled parametric preamplifier for the best noise performance. The hydrogen maser was for deep space tracking, and there was another simple transistor amplifier backup. Most amplifiers can be cooled to get better noise ratio.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2013 7:28 PM, gregz wrote:

There was an atomic clock in one room of the mission control center I was involved in building, in another room was a liquid cooled Cray X-MP super computer. That was 1988, I read somewhere a few years back that the university had a Cray X-MP they were trying to give away. ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd not want a free atomic anything... too much hazmat disposal fee.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/25/2013 9:36 PM, The Daring Dufas wrote:

<http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/08/letter-re-manual-hair-clippers.html Permalink <http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/08/letter-re-manual-hair-clippers.html | Print <http://www.survivalblog.com/2013/08/letter_re_manual_hair_clippers.html Jim, I enjoy your blog very much, have been following it for years. Keep up the good work.
On the many lists of items preppers are encouraged to obtain, I have never seen hair clippers suggested. An essential item. (By hair clippers I mean manual, not electric.) - Pastor D.
*JWR Replies:* Although they are probably still made in India and China, the best place to find traditional clippers is /used/, via eBay or Craigslist. If they are well-made and aren't rust-pitted, even a century-old pair of clippers will probably last/another /century. Just be sure to keep them well-oiled.
Subject: By The Spirit From:
Date: 8/15/2013 9:24 AM Newsgroups: alt.survival
The LDS folks have an expression "by the Spirit". When there is a big decision to make, we pray and listen for the guidance of the Spirit.
And sometimes in every day life, we are prompted BTS to do this or that. Yesterday was such a day. It was lunch time, and I was out to buy pure gas if I could find it, and also to get some to eat.
BTS, I was prompted to go to a particular pizza shop. The last time there, the pizza was burnt around the edge, and I didn't much enjoy it. But, so, the Spirit is prompting and there I went.
The TV was on, and the woman was behind the counter. The over head lights were off, plenty of sunshine coming in the windows. I remarked how they were having a cool afternoon with the lights off, and doors open. No, she says, the power is off. For some odd reason the TV and cash register are fine, but the lights and all the refrigeration is down.
Asked if they had any slices, and they did. Cashed out.
As I got back into my truck, I realized why I was here. I have a bunch of promo flashlights with advertising. So, I took a couple back into the store, and gave to the woman at the cash register. She loved it! Said she had a light on her keyring, but no longer has the same keyring.
So, I got a perfectly cooked slice of pizza, she got a keyring light, and she says they have some work for me, coming up. The power is out, and I'm handing out flashlights. What's the odds?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
Learn about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Atomic does not necessarily mean it's radioactive.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/26/2013 07:29 PM, gregz wrote:

Atomic really means "indivisible".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/13 7:50 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

The Norwegians have an experimental thorium reactor working. Article here: http://tinyurl.com/na8dqze I guess there is less waste and it only has to be stored for 300 years in some type of radiation containment structure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...snip...

Ahh...the circle of life.
The timing equipment that created the Loran signal was controlled by a cesium beam oscillator.
We Loran techs sent out a really, really well timed signal so you could use it to track drift on the same type of clock that was used to create the signal. Cool!
Based on this timeline, Loran D went out of service in the late 60's. Are you sure it was Loran D that you used in the 70’s? Loran C was used before and after that timeline. I never dealt with Loran D, only A and C.
http://www.jproc.ca/hyperbolic/timeline.html

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm pretty sure D, and I think it was an experimental station, and pretty close by. The loran still drifts around. Only long term average was used.
I read D was a short range high accuracy, and portable.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(PeteCresswell);3124664 Wrote: > Specially LittleFuse KLK-15 as in http://tinyurl.com/kfs8gje

Pete:
That's correct. Those cylinder type fuses have no indication if they're blown or not, and the only way to tell is by checking for continuity across them.
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.