Snowblower: Putting Away For The Season ?

Page 1 of 2  
Hi,
What's the "best" way of putting away a Snowblower for the off-season ?
I always put in some of that Stab-Oil, and pull the starter rope a few times. Don't necessarily re-start it, but imagine ther pulling gets the now treated gas into the Carb.
Should I actually run it ?
If so, should I shut it off by closing the valve to the gas tank, and just letting it run out of fuel ?
Or,...?
Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/2016 8:37 AM, Bob wrote:

I run mine dry.
Once left it with gas with Sta-bil but following season it would not start.
Two possible problems, gas evaporates from carburetor gumming it up or ethanol containing gas attacks seals.
I've never had a problem starting next season if I have run dry. Great if you have a valve to shut off. Do that and run dry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 8:37:57 AM UTC-4, Bob wrote:

There's varying opinions on this, so I'll just let you know what I do.
I use Sta-Bil in my gas cans all year, so treated gas is always in my engines.
I put my snowblower up on a dolly and roll it into the back corner of my garage. The back end is propped up so it's not resting on the tires. About once a month I roll it, dolly and all, out into the driveway, start it and let it warm up to operating temperature. I run the auger and the drive wheels a little bit to keep them freed up. Once it cools down, back into the corner it goes.
I look at it this way: Some winters, I could easily go a few weeks (or more) and never need to use it. If it can sit for a few weeks without being started in the winter, then it can sit for a month or so without being started in the off season. I've been doing this for the 6 years that I've owned my current snow blower and it has never failed to start on one pull.
By the way, I do the same thing with my lawn mower in the winter. They share the same off-season, back corner parking spot . During the appropriate season, they are a little more out in the open for ease of access.
One tip: Don't run the snowblower in a dusty environment. They don't have air-filters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/16 8:37 AM, Bob wrote:

Drain gas, run it dry, change the oil, and spark plug. Put some WD-40 or oil inside the cylinder before installing new spark plug and pull the starter to move the piston up and down a few times to distribute the liquid.
Also, clean/replace the air filter, check all nuts for tightness, spray cold weather lube into cables, inspect moving parts for damage- especially impeller. Clean then wipe down metal parts with oil/WD-40.
Come December, pour some fresh gas in there and you're good to go with no fuss and a 1-pull start;-)
--
Some of the greatest minds in the world are right here in America.
Sadly, they have gone into hiding until the 'War On Thinking” is over.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 9:17:11 AM UTC-4, Wade Garrett wrote:

You have an air-filter on your snow blower? What make/model is it?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/16 9:24 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

While I was born/raised "up north", I've lived in the deep south for 40+ years now (and have in fact become an adoptive redneck).
It's been that long since I owned a snow blower- so my maintenance check list was drawn from gladly-faded memory. A little quick research indicated that apparently SBs don't have air filters- so one less step to follow...and sorry for the bad into...
That's pretty much the way I service all my small engines- lawnmower, pressure washer, chain saw, etc., though.
--
You can only judge people upon that which they show you. Nine times out
of 10, it’s their ass.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 8:17:11 AM UTC-5, Wade Garrett wrote:

Agree...DD3 is *WAY* too anal about this!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Most instruction books for the small engines say about the same thing. I don't live where I need a snow blower, but do have a garden tiller that gets used about 2 or 3 times in the spring of the year. At the last usage I let it run empty of gas. Change the oil. Then put a table spoon or so of gas in the spark plug hole.
Been doing this for about 10 years and fill with fresh gas in the spring. Always starts with a pull or two.
I do use the ethanol free gas in the small engines. The chain saws and leaf blowers with the 2 cycle engines are always cut off with the switch or the choke . I never cut the gas off of them or let them run empty if I can help it.
While probably not needed I do put the stabil stuff in all the gas all year for all the engines. I put the required ammount in the 5 gallon cans before I go to the service stations to fill them up just out of habit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't see any possible advantage to adding gasoline to the engine cylinder before long-term storage. It seems totally wrong, to me. The gasoline will tend to contaminate your fresh oil-change, prior to evaporating and perhaps leaving other contaminants .. If you meant that you add a tiny amount of gas to the cylinder for starting - after a long storage ... that's different. John T.
--- ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 1:16:14 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

I've never heard of putting gas into the cylinder either. You can put a small amount of oil in there, which presumably helps prevent any rusting. With marine engines, you use a fogging oil that you spray into the carb for a few seconds prior to shutting it down. That said, I don't put anything into my small engines and haven't had any problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/2016 1:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Would that be different if the fellow put some motor oil in the cylinder?
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nuts, Ment to say motor oil instead of gas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, April 11, 2016 at 1:07:38 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:

I knew what you meant...I'm old too!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/2016 2:07 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

Won't be the first time someone typed the wrong wierd.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I agree with most of this, but you dont need to replace the spark plug every year on something that is only used for a few hours every year. The average person probably only puts about 10 hours or less of use on a snowblower each winter. And even less than that on a garden tiller. I'd inspect the spark plug, but you should only need to replace it after 4 ir 5 winters. Even lawn mowers, which get more hours of use per year, dont need a new spark plug that often.
I would NOT spray WD-40 in the cylinder. Use motor oil ONLY. WD-40 is just kerosene with some additives and it will evaporate in a very short time, AFTER it washes away all the oil on the cylider walls and piston rings. Just put in a few squirts of motor oil, spin the engine so the piston goes up and down a couple times and replace the plug. That's it. (Of course this is after running it out of gas).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/16 2:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

I see your point re: the WD-40. I wonder though if motor oil in the cylinder will eventually succumb to gravity, drain off the walls, piston, et. al., and pool in the lowest point. What about other sprays like Breakfree CLP, etc. I wonder if they'd cling better.
On the plugs, I think it's more difficult than it seems to get all the combustion residue out without damaging/wearing the thing, especially if the engine has been running rich. Some mfrs recommend against using those grit-spraying plug cleaning machines as stuff can get wedged/lodged up inside and gets blown into the cylinder.
The time-honored wire brush method has its detractors too, especially if you're using an old brush with a bent or nicked bristle being more likely to break off and remain in there too.
Hell, I'm a big hitter and I'd just pop for the $2.99 and stick a new one in there!
--
The lion may be King of the Jungle, but airdrop him into Antarctica and
he’s just a penguin’s bitch.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am with you. For just a couple of bucks you can get a new one every 3 to 5 years. May not even need it. I have a weed eater that never has had the plug changed in about 10 years. I probably run it for about 10 to 20 minuits every week or so during the mowing season. I usually pull it one time and it sputters, then take it to half choke and pull and it starts.
I don't know why,but for some reason I change the mower plugs every year. It usually runs 2 hours each time I mow. I guess I got in the habit when I had a POS John Deere mower and bought the service kit every year that had plugs, oil and filters in it. Got rid of it a couple of years back due to the transmission going out. Found out that model was only good for a couple of years if you had any hills or pulled very much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You are overthinking it. Engine oil has been used for devades to preserve engines in storage. You can use heavier oil if you like but it makes it harder to start the engine when you take it out of storage. As for the plugs, NO sand blasting!! It used to be a normal way of cleaning plugs - back when plugs were expensive and were easily fouled with lead. Today a quick bake" with a torch will remove duel and oil fouling - if a plug needs more than that, put in a new one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wasn't it that plugs only went about 10 to 15 thousand miles, now the cars get around 100 thousand or more out of a set of plugs ?
About the same with oil. Maybe a thousand or two miles between oil changes, now 5 to 8 thousand is the normal, more with the synthetic oils.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/11/2016 8:37 AM, Bob wrote:

If your snow blower is two stroke (gas oil mix) might not want to run it dry. I did run my ETQ generator dry, and now it's got a nasty piston rod knock, and doesn't start very well. Manual for the ETQ says to stop it with the switch, not run it dry.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.