snipper for plywood

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On 3/28/2011 12:47 AM, Graven Water wrote:

5x5 is TINY. I'd pull the toilet and the baseboards, pull the trim strip at the door, and just stick a crowbar under the plywood and start prying. Unless the ply is screwed down, it'll come up. Wear leather gloves and goggles. Using short end of prybar, you can probably chew a stripe right up the middle. Take a big knife and slice the vinyl above where you are prying, so it has a place to split. Or use a cheap skilsaw with a cheap rough-cut blade to score through it. You'll know when you hit a nail- it may trash blade, but it won't do anything worse than stall out, throw sparks, and scare you. Just back up and steer around it. You are only cutting 1/4 to 3/8 deep. Stuff like this is what the cheap blades are for- they are considered a consumable.
If all this sounds too gruesome, pay a strong teenager 20 bucks to do the demo. It may take him an hour. Not skilled labor. Again, don't lose sleep over the subfloor- you said you have access from below, so that is trivial to patch. Just add cleats screwed into the joists and another layer of plywood or even 1x4 from below.
--
aem sends...

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Also, if I got a cheap circular saw and it ran into a nail, would that be dangerous?
I wouldn't know where the nails/screws are, unless I take off the vinyl top layer, soften a lot of mastic. That seems like a lot of work. So maybe the snipping idea is better.
Laura
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On Mon, 28 Mar 2011 00:54:04 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote:

No more dangerous than with an expensive circular saw. A) there won't be many nails beyond the floor joists and none an inch beyond them. (but you don't know where those are. Once you find one the others are 16" away almost always. B) wear safety glasses or goggles when using power tools, or at least glasses with plastic lenses. But large plastic safety glasses are only about 4 dollars, is that right?

Well, there are a lot of elecronic nail finnders that work really well. Mine is 25 years old and I don't know what they cost now.

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snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote in

with a carbide-tipped blade,it will cut the nail,no problem. It WILL make sparks and maybe sound bad for a sec. you might buy a cheapo blade from HD so you don't screw up a good circ saw blade.
--
Jim Yanik
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snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote in

you use a CIRCULAR saw,and set the cut depth to less than 1/4 inch,do a "plunge cut".(needs a lot of room,though) Or a Fein Multimaster type of oscillating power cutter. that works in tighter spaces. Or a Ryobi cutout tool or trim router with a 1/8" cutout bit. (set for shallow cut depth) you can probably rent them if you don't want to buy.
Or maybe you should leave this to professionals,like a handyman who will have the proper tools and knowhow.
--
Jim Yanik
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On 3/27/2011 11:57 PM, Jim Yanik wrote:

This has my vote. Use one of the 5" circular saws if you want more control. You can break

As wonderful as those are, it will be dreadfully slow. Use it to finish cuts to the edge as the circ can't get there.
I suspect once this gets starts getting cut up, you can just break it up. Use a mask. MAybe some bleach for the mold.
Jeff

Another good plan.

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She may be thinking of what they used during the French revolution to kill people with.
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 22:26:11 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote:

Start it off by putting it between two barrels or two sawhorses a foot or two apart and whcakcing it with a sledge hammer. Then put it back in place and whack it along the smae break line.

They make Wiz snippers, or something like that with 3 letters, that have increased leverage, but I thought about them before and something makes me think they wouldn't work better. They have shorter jaws and maybe they are thicker, and the thickness would interfere. They come in three colors and you don't want the yellow ones, because the handles are right behind the jaws, and they are only good for short cuts or cuts where the material bends out of the way of the snips.

Oh, you want to do this before you r3emove it. You only said this:
"I >do not want to expose the whole thing all at once. 1/4" plywood is bendable but not very easy to break. "
Why don't you want to?
Next time start with the whole question and the circumstances, so we don't waste time.
Do you have another bathroom. Even if not, you can pull the whole thing up, then lay or use a couple nails ton put scrap plywood down to walk from place to place.
If I'd known that part of it was still nailed down, I would have said to use a crowbar, or a 2x4 for crowbaring. When it's up part way, put your back against the tub and use your feet to make it go farther. When it's over 110 degrees up and over, stand on it to make it break. Or better yet use the circular saw or sabre saw first.

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On 3/27/2011 9:26 PM, Graven Water wrote: ...

OK, that's the info needed--what's the job.
I'd get a construction/demolition blade on the circular saw and set it to the flooring thickness. Dampen the work area some to minimize the dusting problem, wear a mask and cut out a section at a time. Done.
--
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On 3/27/2011 12:13 PM, Graven Water wrote:

Looking at the other posts leads me to believe you're taking up an old floor a tiny section at a time. You can use a wide sharp wood chisel and tap it into the flooring along a line where you want the sections to snap off. Once you have cut part way through the wood, you may take a sharp flat pry bar and slip it under the edge of the wood and pry up. The wood should break off at your cut line. A good wood chisel is a very useful tool to own. ^_^
TDD
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On Sun, 27 Mar 2011 13:13:46 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote Re snipper for plywood:

No such snippers as far as I know. Your best bet would be something like this <http://www.harborfreight.com/variable-speed-jigsaw-46055.html>
--
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

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Re Re: snipper for plywood:

Or, if you only have occasional small cuts to make, you can use a coping saw <http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-coping-saw-with-blades-94848.html>
--
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On 3/27/2011 12:13 PM, Graven Water wrote:

There is also a power saw called a Toe Kick Saw that you could rent. It it designed to cut under the lip of cabinets but it has a smaller blade than a full sized power saw and may be easier to control in the situation you have.
http://toolmonger.com/2007/09/04/crain%E2%80%99s-toe-kick-saw-fits-where-others-wont /
http://preview.tinyurl.com/yc2fwtj
TDD
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On Mar 27, 12:13pm, snipped-for-privacy@grex.org (Graven Water) wrote:

Look for a pair of lopping shears with somewhat straight blades. With 2' handles, the plywood will be an easy cut.
Joe
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Thanks for the help! I bought a circular saw with a 7.25" blade to cut the 1/4" plywood. It worked fine. I broke the edge parts that the circular saw couldn't get to, with xacto knife and prybar, and it is easy and quick.
Some of the subfloor is rotted and the rotten areas go underneath the bathtub and an interior wall. The bottom 2x4 in the wall is rotted somewhat at the bottom too. So it looks like I'll have to take out the bathtub and part of the wall, which is not load-bearing, in order to expose all of the rotten subflooring.
Laura
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