slab vs basement home

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A little off topic, but think those on this site may be a good judge. What are the up and downsides of a slab home other than the obvious storage advantage. My husband and I are thinking of moving and have found some homes we liked that were on slab. We have always lived in a house with basement , but now could live without a basement. We live in metro Atlanta. Thanks Liz
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I wouldnt buy a slab house in an area where basements are the norm. A basement just for storage makes it worthwhile. Asan extra living area it;s a bonus

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What extra living area? If a slab house is one story and 2000 square feet, it has the same area as a house with 2000 square feet spread over a basement and first floor. It comes down to what layout you prefer and what fits the lot it is constructed on. If the lot has ledge you don't get a basement. If the lot has a shallow water table, you don't get a basement.
Differences to consider are cost of heating a one level versus a multi level and cost of roof replacement of a house spread out with a lot of roof versus one with half the area and stacked. Stairs versus no stairs and privacy of bedrooms on a multilevel.
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MANY people finish most of the basement for added living area.....
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MANY people finish most of the basement for added living area.....
But if you have the same amount of space on the same floor, the difference is???? A square foot is a square foot.
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No it isn't. A 2000 sq ft house with a slab is considered the same as a 2000 sq ft house on a basement for tax and MLS purposes. In new construction, basements are not typically billed at the same rate as above grade construction.
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Typo. Make that "A 2000 sq ft home with a basement is NOT considered the same as a 2000 sq ft home on a slab..."
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says...

This varies by jurisdiction -- some tax assessments do include the basement in calculating value, often distinguishing finished and unfinished basement square footage as well.
The taxable value of a 2000 square foot home with 2000 square feet of basement (4000 square feet of total living space) will be higher than a 2000 square foot on a slab or crawlspace in many jurisdictions.
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wrote:

Forget billing and MLS. I'm talking real space to be used, no matter what you call it. or how you count it Taxes are based on value. You can have a 2000 square foot house worth a million bucks or a dump of a house that is twice that size. None of that means anything in the usability of slab versus basement. What does matter is real area that can be used.
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I have a 1000sq/ft ranch with a full finished basement. So, in actuality, I have 2000sq/ft of living space. When the house is sold, it can only be listed as 1000sq/ft. So, I am being taxed for 1000sq/ft.
Tony
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I've never seen a tax based on square feet, but that does not mean it does not exist. Value is what is used in most every town. What does your tax bill read? There is probably a assessment for $xxx and a mil rate.
There is no advantage to either type of construction as far as taxes. What does matter is what works for you. When building your dream house, you decide what size kitchen you want. Then you determine how many bedrooms you need and how big they should be, how many baths, etc. That same amount of space can be configured many different ways, many different styles, with and without a basement.
Look at some older houses versus new. Bedrooms upstairs and laundry facilities in the basement. Dumb, huh? Seems even dumber as we get older and have to carry things up and down the steps. Newer designs are finally putting the laundry near the point of use.
Basements make nice work shops, Unless it is a walk out, you have to get everything up and down also. That works hop on ground level sounds much better. Some basements make good swimming pools, but that was never intended. Dry basements may be nice, but wet ones present problems.
Small lot? Stacking makes a lot of sense. Saves on roofing cost also as less area has to be covered. Better? Well painting up high is not as much fun as painting the same house spread out low. Each house has advantages To just say one is superior to another is silly as we all have different needs.
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Basements can be finished or semi-finished to allow for laundry, games, TV, entertainment and storage. That space doesn't show up in the MLS as living area, but is very useable.
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wrote:

So what? A 1000 square foot house with basement has the same usable space as a 2000 square foot house on a slab. A square foot is a square foot, counted or not. The fact that some of the space is below grade does not make it any better to use than the same space on the same level. Why would you want to cart the laundry up and down the stairs when it can be done on the same level? Why would you want to drag stuff up from the basement when it can be stored on the same level?
Thee maybe other reasons to prefer one type over the other, but total space is not one of them. You can build a 40,000 square foot house on a slab if you want, or you can have a 500 square foot house with a basement.
Many of the pro and con reasons given in this thread are meaningless.
Slabs make cold floors? Not always, they can be built with insulation and even radiant heat.
Ease of running utilities? Not if the basement is finished or the house is two stories. OTOH, if there is an open utility area, cable can be run just as easy and plumbing access is just as simple.
The deciding factor is personal preference for design, cost of construction, total space that is needed, physical limitations,. I have had both and like both, but I'd not say one if definitely "better" than the other.
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wrote:

You could say the same thing about an attached shed, or unfinished attic. You have "occupiable space". Space that you use but lie to the town about, and non-existant space. Where that space is isn't usually relevent, it's just a question of where the space will fit, how convenient it is, and how much it costs.
If you don't have to put in a full-depth foundation, it's likely to be cheaper to build up or sideways than down.
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Yep. Just like an unusually large deck. If the weather in your area permits, it can be an inexpensive way of increasing the usable size of a house without having to pay for traditional building costs.

Agreed.
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A 2000 sf house on a slab has only 2000sf of space. A multi level may have the same 2000 sf of LIVING space but the basement (generally the same size as house footprint) can add a significant amount of room that is usually not taxed but is invaluable for storage workshop etc. A little carpet some wall paint and the basement is a nice rec/play area without any taxes. A slab is worthless for me. In some areas its the only choice but here in NJ only a sucker would buy a slab

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You mentioned where you live now, but not where you want to move next. If it's someplace with an actual winter for 3-5 months per year, you will grow to hate a slab home. Nice, cold floors. They're a blessing in Puerto Rico. They're a curse in upstate New York.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

It really depends on where you are. Look around. Are most new homes with basements in your area, if so go that way. If most are slabs, then that is likely the best choice in your area.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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wrote:

NO ONE EVER HAS ENOUGH STORAGE SPACE:(
Wonder why slab homes are cheaper? Because resale will be less too.
Saves a little on construction, makes maintence a nightmare.......
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wrote:

Joseph, you nailed it! Here in southwest FL, there is only one choice. When there is a choice, balance your desires with what works best.
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