Skylight repair


A branch struck the skylight on the double-wide that we use for our cabin and but a 10" crack along the side. When I went to inspect it I couldn't believe how incredibly thing this cover is. I patched it with screen and caulk but can't see that holding for the winter. Is it reasonable to be thinking that I should be building a frame of treated wood and attaching it to the sides of the window (after removing the tissue that I fixed) and cover that with a piece of 1/8" Lexan. The other option is to use angle brkts and fasten the frame to the roof and caulk around it. Which plan sounds the best? TIA Chuck
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C & E wrote:

I would not add another layer, lest you create a condensation pond. I presume the place sits empty part of the time? I'd fix the skylight or replace it, and add 'roll bars' over the top to deter future debris impacts. A storefront/window company can make you a pretty one, or you could rig up something out of whatever is cheap and convenient. How to attach it to the roof will depend on how your roof is framed and skinned. A few angle brackets into the roof struts, properly caulked, would probably be adequate, as long as whatever you add is not a wind catcher.
-- aem sends...
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Don't know what type of skylight you have. If it is a raised curb type with a sealed safety glass unit installed in the frame the repair is fairly cheap if you can do it yourself.
I just had one repaired in a Velux skylight (19.5 x 45 insulated glass silicone sealed unit). The local glass company only charged $72 for the unit. Since they made two trips I don't feel that the $199 for labor was out of line either.
Reading again what you posted sounds like your crack may be in the housing. Update us.
Colbyt
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You are right on about the curb. That's where the protective cover attaches, such that it is. Good though on the condensation, aem. That's how we discovered the break in the first place - a condensation and rain puddle. I pulled a plastic plug from the curb to drain it onto the roof. Of course, being the cheap POC that it is the plug broke and I'll have to manufacture a new one. The ultra thin cover is why I would like to replace it with Lexan. Many thanks, gents. Chuck
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