Siding in the rain?

I hired a handyman to reside one side of my house. He wants to come out Monday (and Tuesday if needed). Should get it done in one day though. He is out of town for a couple of weeks after this and we were hoping to squeeze it in...
Now I see they are forecasting rain Monday thru Wednesday next week. ( southern Mass )
He's paid hourly so I was hoping to start pulling the siding off this weekend to get things started...
It doesn't sound like a good idea if its going to rain...
Am I correct that we shouldn't put the Tyvek and siding on if the house is wet???? How bad is it if I pull the siding off and then the plywood gets wet???
The area is 17' wide X 16' high. siding is 12" x 16' MDF hardboard (crap) the rest of the house is good just this side needs replacing.
TIA
Steve
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I wouldn't want the plywood to get wet, but you'll probably get 218 conflicting opinions on this.
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I agree. I'm looking for opinions because My guess is the handyman is going to want to get it done if its not poring out. His interests and Mine my differ.
Steve
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Unless it's treated, painted or otherwise protected, wood's not supposed to get wet. End of story. How many opinions do you need? I think your instinct is correct. Schedule the work at a better time.
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Um well, very sorry to disagree but that is not the end of the story. When houses are built the sheathing (plywood) is often exposed to the elements for weeks at a time. The sheathing is exterior rated and is designed to be exposed for a time. Those are facts.
I have seen many partially constructed houses with exposed sheathing be unattended the whole winter. Really, it's preferable to leave the sheathing exposed rather than the housewrap. Housewrap should be installed just before the siding with no delay. If it is allowed to be exposed then it can easily be ruined by the wind. Then, if water gets underneath the wrap you can have damaged sheathing.
Bottom line: It is OK to have your sheathing exposed for a short period of time. It is designed for such treatment. If any gets damaged (unlikely) then replacement is easy. You don't want to apply house wrap while it's still wet. If the OP is determined to wait for perfect weather he may never get the job done at all.
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Is the sheathing treated in some way? If not, how is it "designed" to withstand getting wet?
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I know that the sheathing is designed for exterior use because the manufacturer says so. I also know from personal experience. It is not "treated" and I never said it was.
It is ,however, very water resistant and can withstand multiple soakings with little loss of structural value. Yes, treated wood is used where it will be in continuous contact with moisture. That does not mean that untreated wood is not extremely water resisistant. It is.
It is primarily the water resistant glue that is used to make exterior sheathing that makes it so durable. Interior stuff is use for cabinets, furniture, and the like and uses ordinary glue. It it totally different stuff which would never be used as structural sheathing.
So, when you buy some plywood called CDX you know it's exterior rated because of the X. Actually, all sheet stock used for sheathing is exterior rated. That way, the carpenter knows that he can go ahead and perform the task without worry. It is assumed that if the sheathing gets wet it will eventually have a chance to dry out. Then it is fine.
I have been on many sites where it rained and rained on half-finished houses. Yes, it is better to work with dry wood but the wood is not ruined, not by any stretch of the imagination, neither sheet stock or solid wood. I have seen shacks build with X rated plwood that have lasted for years without any further protection. Bottom line: the stuff is durable because it has to be.
In this case, we have one wall of the house so the sheathing is further protected by the entire house and the overhang above it. Only a hurricane would have any chance of significantly damange this exterior rated sheathing. In the very unlikely case that it were damaged it can be easily repaired. Sheathing is commonly available and simple to install.
Actually, it is far more likely that the existing sheathing is damaged already. It is quite common for this to happen since once water gets in it can have little way to get out. I say tear off the siding on the first dry day so than an inspection can be made and repairs planned. I do not find it necessary to work in the rain but it has nothing to due with the material getting wet. It's just because I don' like to get wet, :).
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I like your thinking! very helpful As this side of the house has been in bad shape for a few years there very well could be damage to the sheathing. Sat and Sun look like good weather. I'll pull the siding off and inspect the sheathing. Extream damage will be obvious but whats the threshhold? I'm guessing I'll poke around looking for soft spots? At most the side will be exposed for 1 more week.
Thanks
Steve
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In my mind it is best to fix anything suspicious while the wall is exposed. Places where water has been getting in will be blackish in color and maybe slimey to the touch. Poke around where the nails and pry a bit on the edge are to see if they are still holding anthing down. Buy more sheets than you need and try to replace full sheets rather than just patching bad spots.
You may also find damaged insulation when you open up the wall cavity. The ultimate decision on what to replace and how it up to the opinion of the carpenter and the budget of the homeowner. If the budget is there I would replace anything that's wet or has been wet including insulation. Just be sure to get the wall cavity dried out first.
When it is dry then put the push on to get the new insulation and sheathing up while it is dry. I like to staple a new vapor barrier facing the inside of the house. Use 6 mil poly and just wrap it around the studs before putting in the new glass. When putting up the sheathing it can be helpful to use some glue or caulk where sheets meet. This will protect your hard work until you can get the housewrap and siding up.
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Its not the rain that can degrade house wrap. I believe that house wrap can be damaged by extended exposure to UV light.
The manufacturer can give you the exact specs but it should be covered within like 4-6 months.

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The OP was looking at a one to two week window of opportunity.
Bill
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This is what I was wondering. During construction the sheathing must be exposed to the weather for some time...

Makes sense, the wood would dry but water under the tyvek would take much longer to dry out.

is this the end of story?
Thanks
Steve
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Tyvek is designed to keep water out and let water vapor pass.
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I can pretty well gaurantee you the sheathing got wet when the house was under construction.
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| >I hired a handyman to reside one side of my house. | > He wants to come out Monday (and Tuesday if needed). Should get it done in | > one day though. | > He is out of town for a couple of weeks after this and we were hoping to | > squeeze it in... | > | > Now I see they are forecasting rain Monday thru Wednesday next week. | > ( southern Mass ) | > | > He's paid hourly so I was hoping to start pulling the siding off this | > weekend to get things started... | > | > | > It doesn't sound like a good idea if its going to rain... | > | > Am I correct that we shouldn't put the Tyvek and siding on if the house is | > wet???? | > How bad is it if I pull the siding off and then the plywood gets wet??? | > | > The area is 17' wide X 16' high. | > siding is 12" x 16' MDF hardboard (crap) | > the rest of the house is good just this side needs replacing. | > | > | > TIA | > | > | > Steve | I can pretty well gaurantee you the sheathing got wet when the house was | under construction. | | I will guarantee you there was no insulation/sheetrock in the wall at the time the sheathing got wet.
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3G wrote:

I wouldn't bet on that.
That's why the drywall mfrs have come out with new paperless "mold-resistant" drywall - their trade ads say it can be exposed to the elements up to 3 months!
So you know contractors have been leaving it exposed all along.
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wrote:

True but that is why mold issues are running wild with new construction. Yet the builders are so confused as to why? The Tyvek is the barrier for moisture. As long as this is intact you should be fine. or if the rain is light. If the heavy rains get through to the plywood- the walls will be affected along this wall- soaking the insulation and interior drywall. Then there is a concern for mold growing later on.
www.moldshield.org
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