short brick wall

Hi,     I am interested in having a small brick wall built around my garden. I am finding it difficult to get a contractor to give me a reasonable price let alone consider even doing this relatively small job. I therefore have decided to try it myself. The wall will be about one foot high and two bricks wide. The length will be about 30 linear feet. The wall will not contact the house. I have a couple of concerns. In general, how deep should one dig down for the foundation, and how thick should the footing be? Also, how deep below the surface should the top of the footing be? In other words, how many bricks should be buried? This probably varies by location and municipality so I am looking for guidelines. FWIW, I am in Queens NY. I have been trying to contact the buildings dept, but it is difficult to contact someone who knows anything there. I appreciate the help. Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CHeck technical notes at www.bia.org They may have something to get you started.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
kilerbbb wrote:

Be sure to check your local codes before you start anything.
The codes may have some specifications that will be required. These are in addition to the usual requirements that are not location specific.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just tore one of those out. I found nothing in our local code regulating it, probably because it would be considered landscaping, rather than building.
Mine, which had lasted many years, had a row of cinderblocks the top of which was about two inches below grade, and bricks on top of that. It never looked good because of the sloppy mortaring, and because they had topped it with what I would call concrete pavers, which somehow had come loose.
I made a wall of pieces of flagstone around my other garden. I dug a trench and filled it with broken rock to the point where the first layer of flagstone would just come up to grade level, then I piled two or three levels of flagstone on top of that (its hard to get flagstone around here). Mistakes I made were not making the base layer wide enough (I wanted a ground level surface I could run the lawnmower wheel along so I wouldn't have to trim, and I should have made that six inches wide, rather than 3) and thus not having a wide enough base for the above-grade tiers, so now I'm going around and trenching behind the base layer, putting in more crushed stone, and replacing the above-ground tiers. I tried to compress the original layer of stone, but apparently didn't do a good enough job and the off-center higher tiers have in some places made my wall lean. By contrast, I buried some cinderblocks around my strawberry bed, with the top about an inch below grade, and laid bricks across them without mortar, and that has held up well for a number of years.
kilerbbb wrote:

--
SPAMBLOCK NOTICE! To reply to me, delete the h from apkh.net, if it is
there.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unless you put a concrete footing down to below the frost line, I wouldn't advise a brick and mortar wall. The mortar will break up rather quickly due to ground motion. You'd probably be better off with one of the blocks made for landscaping that mechanically interlock somewhat, but no mortar. Lots of styles, sizes, and colors
Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.