Sheetrock thickness question ????

Hi all,
I'm completely redoing a bathroom in a house that was built in the 50's. The studs in the walls are 2 1/2" (actual thickness). The wall covering that was ripped out was some kind of compressed paper (not drywall) and the thickness was 3/8" (actual thickness). They used a flat nail with a head like I've never seen before and it had to have been put up with some kind of gun. Getting them out was no problem. Greenboard in my area only comes in 1/2" that I know of. This will leave some extra thickness over the door/window. I'm just curious as to how the pros would tackle this job ?? Thanks very much.
Joey
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1/2 " would be code
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I am not sure what your concern is about extra thickness. I assume you are talking about getting the door and window facings/trim boards back on. You have two choices. Put a 1/4" shim on the edge of the window and door casings and nail the facing back over that, or if the facings are thick enough, saw off 1/4" thickness part way from from the back, leaving a 1/4 by 3/4" strip intact where it fastens to the casings. The latter is what I did.

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I guess the table saw and trimming off some of the moldings might be the answer here, so can I assume they don't make 3/8" greenboard ?
Joey
jhill wrote:

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On Mon, 14 Nov 2005 22:50:40 -0500, Joey

Sounds like your casing is thick enough that you can do that. I'd be more inclined to use a rabbeting bit in a router, but then I have a rabbeting bit and router. A straight bit and a router table would be another option. The only way I would do this on the table saw would be on the flat and nibble it away. Use lots of featherboards.
No 3/8" greenboard but there is 3/8" std. drywall. Since you are "repairing" a damaged wall, I'd use it on the walls with windows/doors and use 1/2" elsewhere.
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Thanks Wes,
Your idea is the best I've heard yet and might very well work. I just hate that I've just purchased another four sheets of greenboard.
Joey
Wes Stewart wrote:

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Don't know about the Borg, but at real supply yards, I never had a problem returning clean, dry, undamaged material.
aem sends...
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Not sure I qualify as a pro but I would plane away however much wood I needed to to get the trim to fit flush to the drywall and the doors/windows. Another option would be to build out or caulk the trim but IMO this would never look as good. Sometimes the hard way is the best way.
It may take less planning then you think. Trim is funny that way sometimes.
Colbyt
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also see if cement board in various thicknesses meets your code.
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