Sheetrock repair


I have a finished basement, with painted sheetrock on the walls. One of the walls got water damaged a year ago, due to outside flooding. The exterior problem has since been fixed, and everything is now dry. The result, however, is a fair amount of minor "bubbling" on the sheetrock.
Can this be sanded down and re-painted, or do I need to have new sheetrock installed? I thought I could just have it sanded, but a friend of mine said that sheetrock has a top layer of paper, and you cannot just sand this down.
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On 9/17/2008 4:44 AM NealR2000 spake thus:

It does (paper on both sides), and unless you want to live with potential mildew or mold inside the gypsum board, you'd be better off replacing it (where needed, of course).
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depends on how good you want it to look, where you live and how moist the basement is on an ongoing basis
is the wall textured or smooth?
your friend is correct, actually paper on both sides
and if you sand too much you'll "burn through" the paper but no huge deal, you can just mud over it to smooth it out
I'd sand or cut off the bumps, skim coat with a little 20 minute mud, let dry (use a fan), prime & paint
it will be fine
cheers Bob
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On Wed, 17 Sep 2008 04:44:37 -0700 (PDT), NealR2000

Your friend is right, sheetrock has a paper layer. It would be easier to replave it, use green sheetrock for mold/mildew resistance.
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Phisherman wrote:

I agree, you probably could shave it down and build it back up with joint compound, but it'll probably be easier/quicker to just knock it down and start over, and you'll get a better finish that way and also you won't wonder whether there's any mold you didn't get.
nate
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Peel,cut or scrape ALL loose paper off (bubbles).. MUCH easier than sanding.Re-screw affected area..Re-set popped screwheads..skim coat the area 2 or 3 times. Using Sheetrock Brand Easysand setting type Joint Compound (20,45,90) instead of regular joint compound will help with any mold as it seems mold doesn't like it for some reason...LOL...Sand,prime and paint..If sheetrock crumbles and falls apart then you will have to cut out the affected area and put up new Rock...Good luck....

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NealR2000 wrote:

go through all the mess and trouble to install a new piece of drywall? Just fix the damaged areas. Unless you suspect mold or mildew behind the effective drywall.
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