shed dimension

Here is a silly question. I am planning on building a 12'x16' shed with 1/2" OSB sheathing. When I build the frame, should the actual dimensions be 12'x16' or should it be 1 inch less in each dimension to account for the 1 inch of OSB? Thanks for the help.
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On Fri, 22 May 2009 11:13:18 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

What do your blueprints say?<g>
Keep in mind that when you go to sheath the roof life is easier if you can use full sheets or trim them slightly. Sheathing a roof that is 8'4" x 16' 6" is a royal PITA.
I'm sure there are plans online that will eliminate a lot of re-doing as you work.
Jim
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wrote:

And in MOST places, a shed that size requires a permit. 100 sq ft is the maximum without a permit around here.
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On May 22, 2:53 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I do need a permit. That is why the question came up. I am trying to make a drawing to submit to the building inspector. In the past I have done interior framing and always account for the drywall when planning dimensions. So I was unsure if common practice is to make the frame to the stated dimension, or should the dimensions describe the full size with wall sheathing.
My original post might have been unclear, but I was referring to sheathing the siding, not the roof.
Thanks, Doug
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On Fri, 22 May 2009 14:53:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That is certainly a local thing. In Florida you need a permit for a dog house, with stamped engineered plans. The old dodge "it is not fastened down" only makes it worse here. "Fastening down" is what the engineering is all about. Those sheet metal or PVC storage buildings you get at the home store are simply illegal. They tend to become missiles in storms with names. You can probably get away with it but if one of your neighbors calls you in, you will be taking it down.
I do agree with Jim. It is a lot easier to make the shed a little smaller, cut a little off the T1-11and make your roof sheathing full sheets.
BTW if you want a set of engineered plans for a 12 x 16 shed (and a couple other sizes) most Florida building departments have them for free. http://www3.leegov.com/dcd/BuildingServices/Permitting/ShedAppReq.htm If you are not in a wind zone you can back off on the simpson clips. When I see how we build in Florida I do get a better understanding of why those little dust devils they call tornados in the Northeast tear so much up. The houses they built when I was in Md would not meet a 60-70 MPH wind code. It is 130 here.
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So the whole thing is you pay about $ 150 worth of permits for the building. What a money maker.
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On Fri, 22 May 2009 17:18:39 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

There is so much bureaucracy in the process I doubt they actually make a dime.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

-- aem sends...
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You're in luck; this was a topic at last night's Habitat for Humanity volunteer meeting.
The measurement is 12 (or 16) feet, outside to outside of the corner studs.
Start with the edge of the sheathing even with the edge of the corner stud. Measure over four feet. This is the _center_ of a stud. Now measure over eight feet. That, again, is the _center_ of a stud.
The tendency is to put the _edge_ of a stud at the 4- and 8-foot marks, because, after all, the studs go every 16 or 24 inches, right? If you do that, you wind up with the edge of the sheathing floating right *next to* the stud.
The important studs are the ones at 4- and 8-foot intervals. All the rest just need to be spaced at 16 inches, more or less.
Note: The sheathing will not form a butt joint at the wall corners. That's OK--it'll all be covered by siding and trim.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
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