Sheared lightbulb in recessed socket

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wrote:

Turn off the power at the breaker. Then turn it off again. Get yourself a long fat carrot. If part of the old filament is still sticking up from the socket, cut a notch in the end of the carrot to clear it. Jam the carrot into the socket and unscrew it. Potato works even better, but probably isn't long enough.
If that doesnt work, just take a long screwdriver, slide it between the bulb base and socket, and twist. Do this in several places until the bulb base is crumpled enough to fall out.
HTH,
Paul
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wrote:

You know they sell curved needle nose plyers, right? They come with a 45 or 90 degree bend. Be sure to shut off the power first.
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I had another idea, hopefully not too harebrained. I could use a flexible shaft attached to my handheld drill to apply a torque inside the socket. The only problem is finding a suitable drill attachment to transmit the torque from the end of the flexible shaft to the inside of the socket. The only thing I can think of is something like a drill "socket wrench" attachment whose outer diameter is slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the sheared off bulb thread, with a rubber band wrapped around the outer rim. (Hopefully the rubber band would produce enough traction to twist the bulb thread.) If anyone can think of a better drill attachment for this strange task please let me know.

--
NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
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writes:

I would like to see that! The traditional remedy is to jam a potato into it.
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Toller wrote:

http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/27542.html
R
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kj wrote:

My favorite tool for that is needlenose pliers, with electricity shut off, of course. Since you cannot access with pliers, I would search the kitchen drawer for a suitable tool.....a couple of wooden chopsticks stuck at angles into the socket, some pressure, twist. Could work. I can't cook, but that kitchen stuff sure comes in handy :o)
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kj wrote:

Brainstorm.....duck tape. Stick that fits the bulb base. Wrap end of stick with bunch of duck tape, sticky side out. Press into unpowered light base, press, twist. Could work.
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It's a good job the pioneers opened up America becouse if it had been left to pratts like you the whole of America would be living in Boston

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And it's painfully obvious you're not part of America; and you must be wayyy into the outback in nz too. Your sig's right; you are definitely backwards.
: > : > : > : > I was doing a routine lightbulb replacement in the recessed ceiling : > fixture in my entrance hallway when the top of the bulb sheared : > off cleanly from the threaded metal part. Great. : > : > I yanked off the bulb, but now the metal part is stuck in there, : > so I have a useless fixture. This would be a pain under any : > circumstance, but the fact that the socket is recessed makes it : > impossible to stick a pair of pliers in there to attempt to unscrew : > the metal part. : > : > The housing for the fixture is attached to the socket, so even if : > I managed to pry it out, I still would not be able to access the : > socket with pliers. I suppose I will have to pull the housing out, : > cut the wire, and replace it with a new housing, splicing the wire : > coming off the new housing into the cut end. : > : > Am I on the right track here? If so, what do I have to do to remove : > the housing. After working at it for a while I didn't get very : > far at all. One would think that one has to rip the ceiling to : > get that housing out, but I can't believe the system would be that : > stupid. : > : > How does one fix a situation like this, without ripping out a big : > chunk of ceiling? : > : > Thanks! : > : > kj : > : > -- : > NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards; : > and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded. : :
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I did a brief google search; here was a different idea:
Take a bar of soap and insert the corner into the socket. Give it a few turns and that base will unscrew. Make sure that the soap is dry and that the power is turned off. ---------------------------------

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kj wrote:

The solutions for removing broken light-bulb bases are as varied as the remedies for hiccups. All work to one degree or another.
Before you begin on the list, slather the socket with WD-40.
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HeyBub wrote:

Hi, I just turn off the power to the fixture and use needle nose plier and then you know what. To prevent this kinda trouble I always use a dab of Silicon dielectric grease on the bulb base. Tony
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Dude, did you get your bulb out yet?
A few ideas for you.
1. Get a plumbing test plug at the hardware store that will fit into a light bulb base. They have an expandable rubber housing that is adjusted with a nut on the top. I'm not sure if they make them that small, however.
2. Epoxy and a fat bolt. Glue the threaded end of the bolt in the socket and use a socket wrench on the bolt head when it's dry.
3. Get a wooden dowel the same diameter as the socket, cut it in half lengthwise. Insert both halves into the socket and wedge open it with a lag bolt inserted into the cut. Turn the dowel (not the bolt) Be careful when wedging it with the bolt, you will be tightening the base as you turn it. Also be careful you don't expand the socket out of round.
4. Try using right angle snap ring plyers. You can find them in any automotive store.
5. Mud over the recess hole with joint compound and light the room with a desk lamp.
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posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

Homies has something like this for guess what! Removing broken bulbs. And where in the store would they be? Why in the electrical section...
--
My boss said I was dumb and apathetic.
I said I don\'t know and I don\'t care...
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