Sewer Remediation


At least that's what the city calls it.
But you may be interested in their technique.
At one end of the block, the workers dug down about eight feet to the original sanitary sewer line. This line is a concrete pipe, about ten inches in (outside) diameter with 3/4" thick walls.
Into this concrete pipe, the city pushes a PVC (let's call it PVC - it's probably depleted uranium) pipe that's actually larger than the original concrete pipe. They hammer this new pipe hard. The new pipe travels at least 1000' (to the next work-hole), fracturing the original concrete pipe as it goes. They did some serious hammering - the ground shook. It frightened my fish. Beer in the fridge went bad.
The city then goes into each backyard with an itty-bitty backhoe, digs down eight feet and connects - through some magical process I haven't seen yet - each house to the new pipe.
Prior to all this digging and hammering, the workers attached some sophisticated electronic gizmo to the sewer, water, gas, and telephone cables (in turn) and spray-painted the grass with mystical runes - of different colors - to mark where these underground utilities traveled. The electrical lines are above ground.
My son did ask one of the workers what happens to the, ah, sewage between destruction of the old pipe and the eventual reconnection to the new pipe. The official response was: "Oh, well..."
Anyway, the part that amazed me was the pushing, and resultant cracking, of the original pipe by the new PVC conduit. The military should consider this plastic pipe as tank armor.
The original concrete sewer pipe was laid, I imagine, when this sub-division was originally built up: in the 1960s.
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Recently in Chicago, an old (older that what you describe) sewer system was improved by inflating a kind of balloon inside the old tunnel and then curing it in place. Here's a link to a .pdf file that discusses it: http://www.kennyconstruction.com/news/CIPP%20Tim%20Mahon%20&%20Ed%20Campbell%20072004.pdf
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Not sure if it was Chicago but there was a show on TV like Extreme Engineering where they detailed it all.
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Rounded things are usually more resistant to exterior forces than interior forces. Ever watch a baby bird poke its way out of its eggshell? Tom HeyBub wrote:

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