Semi-OT: Went to an auction

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Robert Green wrote:

Inasmuch as I always act pro se, I take that, too, as a compliment. Thank you ever so much. Again.
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You're welcome. I've complimented you before on your wide range of knowledge and your ability to debate withOUT Tysoning someone's ear off. Don't let it go to your head. (-: As for pro se victories, I won a five thousand dollar case as a pro se litigant against a female attorney in Virginia. As a bonus, the judge seriously dressed her down for holding my business papers illegally as ransom for an alleged unpaid bill her accountant clients wanted paid. When she refused to return my stuff, I filed a subpoena duces tecum to recover them, sending the sheriff to her office during a client meeting! Back then a writ like that only cost 15 bucks to file. The judge found the accountants behavior so outrageous, he not only cancelled the bill, but ordered them to refund monies already paid to them by me. You don't win contracts cases any better than that.
The attorney walked out of the courtroom with a look on her face that women only make when submitting to "bung bung." Some things are just priceless. This was shortly after my sister became a rug rat judge (juvenile court master) and I wanted to prove to my parents (and myself) that I could have been a lawyer, too - if I wanted to spend my life being bored to death. Cross-examining yourself on the stand requires a dual personality, which fortunately I have.
A few years later I won $14,000 from an attorney who tried to raise his rates on a case unilaterally. Fortunately I had preserved the one paragraph yellow lined paper retainer agreement in his own hand we had signed limiting his rates to what he charged me just out of law school ($20 per hour). The case dragged on for five years and by that time he was a successful attorney charging $120+ an hour. I didn't even have to go to court or the bar association because he would have been mortified revealing what a low rate he once accepted. He just grunted and recalculated the bill at the old rate. Three years later little Stevie H. Esq got disbarred for six months for co-mingling his clients funds with his own. I remember calling his office and getting an answering service that indicated his partner now wanted nothing to do with him. Ah, the law.
-- Bobby G.
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wrote:

You consider that a win? From the cheap seats it sounds like you took advantage of a newb. Obviously, there's more to the story. Less obviously, I'm not asking for it. ;)
R
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On Sat, 22 Oct 2011 19:01:54 -0400, "Robert Green"

I had a "good" lawyer when I divorced. Real nice guy. Seriously. I liked him. A relaxed, laid back guy. Ex-cop. My ex had a "bad" lawyer. Real prick ball of nerves. You can guess how that worked out.
--Vic
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wrote:

As Han said about the medical free market myth, picking a good lawyer is hard for a layman. How do you evaluate the skill of someone who's had years of advanced training and education?
We had one lawyer at one of the big firms I worked for that was brilliant - but completely lacking people skills. He spent his spare time suing the President, the Vatican and anyone else whom he thought had acted badly and "needing suing." (-: They kept him around as a junk yard dog to strike terror into opposing counsel. It turned out to be very useful to have a controlled madman on staff. I had a situation where I paid him $50 to make one three minute phone call for me. Money well spent. He talked twice as fast as most people, which I came to realize really puts the other side at a disadvantage. Peter was perhaps as good as an drill sergeant in "reading the riot act" to someone and having them take serious notice.
I had to choose my lawyer Stevie well ahead of my legal PC support career at age 20 something and I basically had to bottom feed. Find someone hungry enough to work for a low hourly rate because you can bet in a five year case, there are going to be some serious cha-chings. Most people have no idea how to select a lawyer and either rely on referrals from friends or blind choosing on the internet or Yellow Page (does anyone still use them?) Neither did I at that point. I picked one, by luck, good enough to win my case but not much better. (-:
Lots of cops get into law when they see how little criminal attorneys do and how much they earn, shearing panicked people charged with a serious crime. I've even heard lawyers say what cops say: "A law degree is a license to steal."
The guy I mentioned that was arrested and advised to plead guilty in the other message was a teacher in VA. Completely exonerated, the little liar that accused him kept changing her story until she finally confessed she just didn't like him.
He lost his house, his job, his income, his standing in the community. I don't want to embarrass him further, but the charges and the case (the lead detective, a woman, NEVER interviewed the kid, IIRC and relied on hearsay testimony to charge him). You can be minding your own fu&ing business and have some little teenager use the legal system to take everything you have from you, without even a "sorry" from the cops/commonwealth atty.
So that's why when people are arrested, they panic and sign retainers for $100's of thousands without thinking very hard or "shopping critically" for the best lawyer. I know of plenty of cases where they acquire that lawyer only *after* they fire the first. Fortunately some judges (probably not ones that were lawyers) are ruling more and that a $100,000 retainer/contract where they've done only a few hours of work during an arraignment is unconscionable and instead pay them for the hours worked, especially if they were terminated by the client for good reason like missing a hearing or a filing date. .
-- Bobby G.
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The other way I heard it was: I refuse to enter into a battle of wits with an unarmed opponent. ;-)
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Oren wrote:

I asked about firearms. The owner said they occasionally found long guns; seldom pistols.
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 17:10:07 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

But that "storage" is the second drawer in the nightstand. ;-)
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On Tue, 18 Oct 2011 22:35:54 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

You gonna shoot the firemen?
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I was at my storage place about four or five months ago, and there was a semi backed into the bay with the doors open, a _lot_ of wardrobe boxes sitting along side, and the guys had strung some line along the side of the 40' trailer and there was a ton (maybe literally!) of women's clothing hanging from the lines.
I asked one guy what was up and whether he was having a garage sale or something. He said he had bought some previously-rich woman's storage units at auction for $5,000. Most of the clothing still had the tags, never worn and all of it was designer stuff. Handbags, belts, shoes, yada, yada. The woman had three large, combined units that totaled ~1500 SF full of clothing.
On the side of the truck alone, there was at least two or three grand in leather pants. The wardrobe boxes cost over a grand, and that with a volume discount. The guy bought a high end designer store full of clothing and accessories for five grand.
R
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On 10/18/2011 5:49 AM, HeyBub wrote:

I furnished my first home on auction purchases. Country auctions were good entertainment for the kids in the early days; they ran around and played, got some good sloppy-joes for lunch, and I shopped til I dropped. That was after round oak tables went out of style and before Avon bottles became antiques.
I scrounged through all the boxes of "stuff" to find goodies...spotted a tiny wood-block printed Bible in a box once, but it was gone when the box was sold. Have an 1812 "History of the United States" around somewhere...
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On 10/18/11 05:49 am, HeyBub wrote:
<snip>

I can't imagine that a person being evicted wouldn't take with him a Patek Philippe watch, if he knew what it was -- or even if he didn't.
Perce
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Great story, even if it isn't true
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Won't argue on the Corvette, but you're off the mark on some of the others by a large bit. Did you know that the IRS has a standardized deduction for a stuffed toy when you donate it? It's something like three or four bucks. So for the deductions alone, you'd come out way ahead on that particular lot.
R
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Harry K wrote:

The guy who bought the 50 boxes of toys has a booth at a giant flea market. If he sold each of the stuffed animals at a buck each, he would quadruple his money easily.
As for the Corvette, your estimation of the price being $200,000 too low is off by about $200,000. There are some listed on Ebay (1979 models)
* Current bid, $10,000 http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Corvette-L48-1979-C3-Chevrolet-Corvette-L48-350-T-Tops-NewEngine7KMiles-NewInterior-/160665346836?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item256866a314
* Current bid, $11,999 http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Corvette-CORVETTE-1979-CORVETTE-T-TOP-CUSTOM-GROUND-UP-RESTORATION-NICE-/170713442779?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item27bf5069db
* Current bid, $11,990 http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Corvette-1979-CHEVROLET-CORVETTE-85K-ORIGINAL-MILES-/120783942488?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item1c1f48b358
* Current bid, $9,600 http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Chevrolet-Corvette-1979-Red-L82-4spd-Corvette-Fresh-Restoration-Very-Rare-Vette-Oyster-Leather-Int-/280753658945?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item415e38dc41
And three more, down to $5,000.
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And I'll bet all of lthem are high mileage, non-historic vehicles.
Harry K
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Only if it was the real pace car. There were plenty of replicas sold (every mfgr. that paces the 500 does this, and has for decades.) Only the VIN can tell you for sure. Otherwise it's just a '79 Vette with some ugly decals.
nate
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