Sawzall for building as well as demolition?

When we moved to our present home, I left my circular handsaw behind.
Now I've got several projects that call for a reciprocating saw (I'm looking at the Milwaukee Sawzall 6509-22).
I know that the reciprocating saw is normally considered to be a tool for demolition work, but has anyone used one as substitute for a circular saw for occasional _construction_ projects?
I suppose the question boils down to whether the Sawzall can produce relatively smooth cuts with enough control to produce good work.
Thanks for any thoughts
Northe
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Good enough for making batter boards, surveying stakes, and lopping off furring strips, but for framing, stick with your circular saw. If you're really picky about your framing work, buy a 12" miter saw or chop saw and use the 7 1/4" only where you absolutely must. And that's my biased opinion, YMMV.
Joe
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No. Well, maybe in the hands of a superskilled woodworker but not in the hands of 99% of the rest of us. Way too much vibration.
KC
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wrote:

strait edge as a guide. But they are <slow>. I only have so many years left. If my skilsaw died and I only had a couple cuts left to button up a project, maybe. Otherwise, even if I had to drive an hour to buy another saw, I'd be better off, time-wise.
Note that I have seen framing crews use a gas-powered chainsaw to trim the edge of a third-story roof deck, walking a 5-12 roof with no harness. So, there are people out there that do crazy things.
aem sends....
aem sends....
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Northe wrote:

<grin> I think the question is: Do I have the patience, the strength, and the time to have the sawzall do what a circular saw can do far easier with better results in a 10th of the time? Sure, a sawzall with a short, wide blade could be made do a reasonable job; but so could a pruning saw.
Now, go get a new saw!!! :-)
--
Dave
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IMO, No. I could not do projects without both.
The good news is that the el-cheapo circ saw will do and adequate job for most home users. I did many projects over the years with a Wally-world b&d circ saw. For daily use they won't last real long. For most people they will do fine. The cheapest of the lot will make a cleaner, faster cut than a recip.
For a recip saw, buy a good one if you buy one at all. The cheap ones won't last. Most Milwaukee products are good. I don't recognize the particular model you mention.
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On Sun, 2 Sep 2007 18:54:55 -0400, "Colbyt"

10 amp, 7 pounds, available for about $100.
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Harbor Freight has a recip saw for $19.99. It is okay but a Milwaukee is far better. I was given a Milwaukee after I bought the HF and found the Milwaukee cuts quicker and has less vibration. I would not use one for construction but it works great for demo!

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Northe wrote:

Thanks for all the replies. It seems clear that I'll need to get both!
Northe
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On Sun, 02 Sep 2007 11:23:13 -0700, Northe wrote:

A Sawzall is as accurate as you can handle it. Good enough for framing but I'd use a circ saw for straight edges.
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Why not? I do it all the time. My brother-in-law uses a chain saw for construction! It all comes down to skill from practice!

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On Thu, 6 Sep 2007 09:03:07 -0500, "Mike Dobony"

Funny you said that. We have some Amish people in our rural neighborhood. I visit them often and they are nice people. They have helped me several times, so when they had a barn raising I offerred to help. I was quite amazed to see them build the entire barn with a chainsaw. They can cut that wood as straight as I can with a circular saw, which amazes me. To me a chainsaw is only for cutting trees and firewood. Of course those Amish guys could not believe it when I cut down a 6 inch diameter tree with a circular saw. My chainsaw would not start (as usual), so I used the circular saw, and just went all the way around the trunk.
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Years ago, I was installing a door, and the door was taller than the frame. I carefully marked the cut line, and had at it with a jig saw (recip blade some what like a sawzall). The saw was running slow, and so I was pushing pretty hard. When I finished the cut, the top line was straight, and the other side of the door, the cut was wavy and all over the place.
I did have a circular saw, and should have used it. For so many straight line cuts, a circular saw is far superior.
You can get a junk sawzall for about twenty bucks at Harbor Freight, they go on sale often for 17..99, I think it is.
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wrote in message

Indeed you can. Or you can buy quality that will last.
The retaining pin (for the blade) for my Makita was no longer working. I went to the local dealer and was told that saw is obsolete. It is 18 years old. I do still have 2 of those pins in stock.
I bought them both.
Based on my experience to date the saw should outlive me.
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On Thu, 06 Sep 2007 19:16:34 -0400, Colbyt wrote:

Industry standard is the original Milwaukee Sawzall. I've beat mine to death and it refuses to die. Love the quick twist chuck too.
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