Running electric...

I'm putting a bathroom in my 2nd floor (new construction, none exists at this location).. I need to bring a few circuits up from the service panel in the basement. There is two chases available for me to run them in, seperated by the chimney between the two chases. The first chase is full (Heat, AC Return, various other electric cables just hanging in there)...I want to use the other chase....Problem is tacking the cables in the chase as I only have access from the 2nd floor and the basement, no way to secure the cables at the 1st floor level (w/o removing walls, etc on the 1st floor).
I'd like to run EMT from the 2nd floor to the basement and run the cables through that....Is there any code issues with running the cables through EMT? I'd be able to secure the EMT on both the 2nd floor and the basement level.
Thanks in advance, this group has always been helpful in the past!
Matt
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There is no problem fishing the cable through the chase. You don't have to staple it where you can't reach it. If you want to use conduit, I'd recommend PVC, so if the cable were to get cut by the conduit, it's nonconductive.

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Uh, no, metal conduit is stronger, won't break, splinter or crack, and more protective phsically, plus nearly any code will accept it. Not so with plastics. That's not to say plastic isn't acceptable; it may well be fine with your local codes. The only way to know is to check. They're in the phone book, easy to find.
I can't imagine how you would think conduit can cut wire; if it goes in uncut, it'll stay uncut. Moreso in metal, in fact, than in plastic.
All that said, there ARE correct ways to use conduit; research it a little bit if it's totally new to you. Do it right and then you can forget about it after it's in, and you'll never lose a night's sleep over it.
HTH
Pop

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Metal conduit would need to be grounded.
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wrote:

You're supposed to carefully file out the inside of the cut ends of the pipe to make sure there's no sharp "flash" or burr left that might damage the wires as they are pulled through. An electrician friend of mine was quite emphatic about that. A rattail file should do fine.
Greg Guarino
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Filing the burr is fine when you are using fittings, like connectors and couplings, if you're sleeving romex through it, you have to use proper bushings, and like John said, it has to be grounded, so if it should cut through the insulation of the romex, it trips the breaker and doesn't just make the sleeve "live". Which is in many cases what makes it impractical to use

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wrote:

It ould cut the wire if the pipes became separated, and going to floors will require at least 2 sticks of conduit, so you must be sure the coupler is very tight. Personally, I'd use the pvc, which once is glued, will not come apart. However, if you want steel, use Greenfield. That us a spiral metalic conduit that flexes and is durable. It's used in commercial applications very often to meet all codes.
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Pop wrote:

Fishing Romex through such a space is a common practice. I don't see why conduit is useful.
I don't see an advantage of EMT over PVC.
In addition to reaming the pipe, the NEC requires a fitting (connector, coupling) on the ends to protect the cable (2005NEC 300.15-C). This provides a more rounded edge. Even this edge can cut the jacket and insulation if installed carelessly. I know of no requirement for a bushing.
"Short sections" of conduit for protection of cable are not required to be grounded (250.86-ex2).
bud--
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You're correct, if you consider 16 feet of emt a "short section"

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>> >>"Short sections" of conduit for protection of cable are not required to be >>grounded (250.86-ex2). >>
RBM wrote:

"Short section" is a remarkably ambiguous phrase and I would think you could get very different answers from different inspectors. I agree going one story sounds longish. One could also argue the EMT is not for protection and doesn't qualify for the exemption. I would beg the question and fish it.
bud--
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I'm with you

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wrote:

A "short section" is one less than 30,000 miles long.
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hah wrote:

((snipped))
No way! A section is a mile square so each side is 1 mile long (5280 feet). Thus a short section has to be less than 5280 feet. Unless one means to say it is a section short.
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On Wed, 08 Mar 2006 00:12:57 GMT, "George E. Cawthon"

How many #12 wires can you put in a 1-mile square conduit?
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

One.
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