Round rubber pieces or pipe with ID of 22 mm?

Rubber, or any material similar to rubber. It will be pushed onto a standard 608 bearing, like a tire onto a wheel. Thickness must be at least 1/8 inch. A material like Delrin might be too hard but it's a possibility. I guess plastics like HDPE might work. Maybe a pipe of some such material with 22 mm ID could be sliced. My ability to shape/machine material is very limited. I need need 10 or more pieces.
It needs to absorb some shock and be durable. But at the moment I'm mostly interested in finding possibilities with 22 mm ID.
Thanks.
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Maybe:
O rings Can you buy "flat" - rings silicone surgical tube Nylon beverage tube - get it hot to slip on 3/4" rubber automotive heater pipe 3/4" coloured silicone tube autoparts sell for "customising" Adhesive lined heatshrink (a bit thin) Places that make seals will freeze & custom machine nitrile rubber to whatever you want. Look in the spare parts catalogs for sliding aluminium door fittings - lots of cheap roller wheels etc.
What sort of load are you applying / whats the application?
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On 3/9/2012 14:56, John Doe wrote:

Fiber enforced rubber hose, like radiator hose, works fine and is durable. It is possible to push it around an object sligtly bigger than the ID of the rubber hose, like 19mm ID hose to 21mm OD rod.. Easy to cut with knife.
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On 3/9/12 6:56 AM, John Doe wrote:

A propane torch to heat the material so it can expand might help.
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Heating rubber with a propane torch generally produces more stink than expansion.
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John,
Hose with an ID of 7/8" is 22.23 mm. Wrap a piece of tape around the circumference of the bearing and you should be able to stretch rubber hose on. Or use an appropriate glue on the circumference of the bearing. Rubber cement comes to mind. Hydraulic hose should have the appropriate wall thickness. There are a great variety of hoses with an ID of 7/8"
Dave M. .
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In reply to the question about my application...
The shock and durability requirement would be much less than an inline skate wheel. That still might seem like a lot, but the force is always glancing since the wheel is on a bearing. And in this case, the bearings might be in two rows, staggered (like in the link below, but much smaller). Also, these small wheels will not be used for pushing, so there will be no typical wear like on a skate wheel. Also, they will not be in contact with the ground during ordinary use, only when the front wheel dips into a pit or pothole. There is a radical example of applied force, like when jumping up onto a curb and landing in the middle of the frame, but I'm interested only a reasonably functional version.
http://bontskates.yuku.com/topic/893/Bont-7-wheel-concept-frame#.T1pZynklquJ
I'm sure Alexander Bont came up with the concept of staggered skate wheels before I did, but (with all due respect) the best application of staggered wheels is rough terrain skating, not downhill.
There are lots of off-road inline skates that are supposed to resemble skis, but with only two wheels (one in front and one in back), they are nothing like skis. They are like an all-or-nothing seesaw. In order to resemble skis (on dry land), skates must have center wheels like an ordinary inline skate. Only the front wheel size matters for traversing obstacles on rough terrain. Trailing wheels can be small if they are closely spaced. And if the center wheels are not used normally, a medium or large rear wheel is useful. If the center wheels are very small and homemade like what I'm talking about, they won't be useful for turning, so they should probably not normally contact the ground. So that while turning the center wheels do not contact the ground, having two staggered rows of bearing wheels might be too wide. The wider they are, the higher off the ground they must be. Also possible is a tank tread setup using something like a fan belt and only one row of bearings.
The objective is to keep terrain from getting in between the wheels so that the ride over rough terrain is smoother. With As little device resistance as possible.
--

Thanks to the replies.

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This is more detail.
http://www.bont.com/concept.htm
At least two of the concepts on that page are good for rough terrain skating. The staggered wheels and the large front with small trailing wheels (the large rear wheel makes no difference). But they are promoted for speed skating. Those two designs might be good for speed skating, but they are obviously better suited for street or off-road skating. That's kind of weird IMO that they don't say that since they make off-road skates.
I know the large front wheel design is good for street and rough terrain skating, because I've been using big front wheel skates for years. The staggered wheel concept is obviously good for rough terrain. With experience skating on rough terrain, you can tell by just looking at the lack of space between the wheels.
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A tank tread design encompassing the front wheel would need to use a very reliable belt, since a broken belt causes a crash.
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