Roof Pitch Specification for Garage

Does anyone know the preferred method for specifing roof pitch? Should I specifiy it as an integer value of say 6-in-12? Would a truss builder not like to build say a 6.125-in-12 truss?
...Or is it better to work in integer angle values like 30deg? I want to draw up plans that make sense for the truss builder, but also make it easy to mitre pieces like facia boards.
Thanks,
Strato
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net wrote:

Hi, Garage building kit comes in many forms and stages(from shell to full finish) No need to worry about truss or whatever unless you are dealing with some special circumstances. Tony
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" snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net" wrote:

The truss manufacturer will want to see 5/12, 6/12, etc. If you are drawing plans, one thing to note is that the truss manufacturer will draw a set of truss plans for you. If it is an existing building, then the agent will come out and measure for the trusses himself. This is best due to the fact that any errors in dimensions will then be his to repair or replace, rather than you.
If this building is in the plan stages, then a floor plan and a roof plan will give him everything that he needs to know. Typically the roof plan will be drawn showing overhangs, ridges, valleys, etc and a spec for the slope (as in 6/12). If you have vaulted ceilings, pan ceilings or any other special requirements, then they will need plans showing those, also. A detail of your overhang can be helpful, too. He will ask all the questions that are needed to manufacture the trusses, and draw a detailed truss plan with an engineers stamp on it. Most jurisdictions require this for code enforcement. Unless you are an engineer or architect, you cannot draw plans for the trusses. You can draw a set of plans, have the manufacturer approve them with a stamp and then use them, but they can do it better and faster than you can. Best to let them do what they do best. The plan will show placement, bracing requirements, and any other details that you need to receive a permit and for code inspection.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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wrote:

Robert, thanks for your detailed reply. I was just drawing some plans to get a rough idea of what everything will look like. I have access to pretty high-end solid modeling software (Pro/Engineer). I will leave it to the truss manufacturer to come up with the final truss design as you say. From your reply, it doesn't sound like I have to assume an exact integer rise vs. run pitch value.
Strato
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Strato wrote:

Would this help any in your design?: http://www.diydoctor.org.uk/projects/roof_trusses.htm
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Strato,

Last year I had to order some trusses for our house. They were a fairly unique raised heel vaulted ceiling truss. I drew up a simple plan of what I was basically looking for, with rough dimensions spelled out (i.e. 2' high raised heel (2x6), 9/12 exterior pitch, 6/12 interior pitch, 1 foot overhang, extra load capacity).
They sent me back their engineered version of my idea, accounting for thicknesses of the framing members, something I failed to do. Because this affected the height of the ceiling peak inside, one company sent me two plans back, one that used the interior ceiling pitch I had asked for, and another with the ceiling peak height I asked for (which deviated slightly from the 6/12 pitch I asked for). Their engineered plan included specifications for where I should place the bracing.
I included a copy of their truss plans with my building permit. The county then wanted me to put additional solid blocking between the trusses on each side for extra support. I also added additional bracing on the center vertical web during construction.
It was actually all quite simple, and the truss companies contacted me with any questions they had about my requirements. I was able to review the truss plans before they actually built them in case there were any changes to be made.
Anthony
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